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News from OSF HealthCare Little Company of Mary Medical Center 

 

OSF HealthCare and Smith Village Offer Grief Support
Two of the Southland’s leading sponsors of adult support groups  OSF HealthCare and Smith Village  are joining forces to offer a free six-week adult bereavement program available via Zoom, Wednesdays, July 15 through Aug. 19, 1 p.m. 

Each week, the hour-long sessions dealing with the loss of a relative, friend or close colleague will be led by three experts: Chaplain Dennis Shelton and social worker Jessica Allison MSW, both of OSF HealthCare, and Diane Morgan, Smith Village social service director of long-term care. 

“Deaths from the COVID-19 pandemic have touched many more people than in normal times,” said Allison. “We thought addressing this topic from three points of view would be greatly beneficial to survivors.”  

The first meeting will focus on the grieving process.  

The sessions will be presented via Zoom, a video conferencing platform that can be accessed on computers or mobile telephones. To download the software, go to https://zoom.en.softonic.com/?ex=MOB-575.6. 

Pre-registration is required to participate in the weekly sessions. To register contact Jessica Allison, 708-229-6913 or jessica.n.allison@osfhealthcare.org. The meeting ID and password needed to participate will be provided.  

OSF HealthCare is an integrated health system owned and operated by The Sisters of the Third Order of St. Francis. The OSF HealthCare Ministry includes 14 hospitals throughout Illinois and Michigan. Smith Village is a life plan community in Beverly/Morgan Park.  

 

 

OSF Healthcare Little Company of Mary Names New President 

OSF HealthCare has named Kathleen Kinsella president of OSF HealthCare Little Company of Mary Medical Center in Evergreen Park.  

Kinsella has served as the hospital’s chief operating officer since 2018 where she was responsible for operational issues with a focus on safety and positive clinical outcomes for patients. She was instrumental in facilitating the successful transition of Little Company of Mary to OSF HealthCare in February.  

Kinsella has more than 30 years of health care experience in ambulatory and hospital medicine consulting and implementing solutions for operational, financial, quality and regulatory issues in varied professional environments. She received her Bachelor of Science in occupational health and safety education from the University of Illinois at Champaign-Urbana and a Master of Science in health care administration from the University of St. Francis.  

“Kathleen is a shining example of our Mission to serve with the greatest care and love and I am thrilled to welcome her into her new role as president of OSF Little Company of Mary,” said AJ Querciagrossa, chief executive officer, Metro Region, OSF HealthCare.  

Kinsella takes over for John Hanlon, MD, who is retiring after a nearly 40-year career, the last two years as president of OSF Little Company of Mary. The transition will be effective July 10.  

 

 

OSF HealthCare Little Company of Mary Medical Center Continues Tradition of   Catholic Health Care on Chicago’s Southwest Side 

OSF HealthCare Little Company of Mary Medical Center officially became part of the OSF HealthCare Ministry on Feb. 1, making it the 14th hospital in the Peoria-based health system.  

The Sisters of the Third Order of St. Francis and the Little Company of Mary Sisters align themselves with the philosophy, mission and values that guide decision-making in a way that respects the dignity of the whole person and puts the needs of the patient first. It is the mission of OSF HealthCare to serve with the greatest care and love in a community that celebrates the gift of life. 

“On January 19, we celebrated 90 years of our health care ministry in Evergreen Park,” said John Hanlon, MD, MMM, president of OSF HealthCare Little Company of Mary. “This merger between OSF and Little Company of Mary assures the continuation – and strengthening – of Catholic health care in the southwest Chicago suburbswhile allowing us to join with OSF in leading health care transformation throughout our community.” 

At the stroke of midnight Feb. 1, the process began to switch all information technology systems, including patient medical records, lab, pharmacy, and every other technology that runs a hospital, over to OSF. The process took several hours, with no disruption to patient care. 
Personalized, innovative care is a priority for OSF HealthCare. Our innovation teams have partnered in and committed to the advancement of care at the most personal level,” said Bob Sehring, CEO, OSF HealthCare. “OSF HealthCare believes that through this partnership, better health can be created and value delivered across our communities.” 

The Illinois Health Facilities and Services Review Board approved the change of ownership exemption application between OSF and Little Company of Mary in mid-December, with the merge of the organizations receiving canonical approval from the Vatican a week later. 

Technology Feat 

On the OSF HealthCare Little Company of Mary Medical Center website, the changeover was described in detail 

After months of planning that involved thousands of people across the OSF ministry, the systems that powered everything at Little Company of Mary were converted to OSF systems at midnight on Feb. 1It took about two and a half hours to get everything up and running, and then the process of getting everything settled comfortably into place began. 

It was an impressive transition that was accomplished while the hospital continued caring for more than 200 patients during switchover, not including those coming into the emergency department. The conversion covered more than 600 different systems, bringing them live all at one time, explained Jim Mormann, CEO, Integrated Solutions and Chief Information Officer for OSF HealthCare. “There’s a lot of sequence of events and a lot of pieces that have to occur to ensure that patient safety is kept to the highest a degree possible along with keeping all of our systems functioning effectively,” he said in the website coverage.  

Members of the integrated solutions team and others remained onsite to make sure everything is running smoothly and that the new OSF Little Company of Mary Mission Partners are comfortable with them. 

Sharing a Mission 

The merger was more than just the coming together of two hospitals, it was also linking both congregations of Sisters that oversee the organizations. Special moments were woven into their first Mass, celebrated on Feb. 1 by Father William Grogan, Vicar for Health Care for the Archdiocese of Chicago. 

The ritual enhanced the understanding for the transference from the Little Company of Mary Sisters to The Sisters of the Third Order of St. Francis. Featured was a table with the baptismal record of the many thousands of babies born at Little Company.
Mary Jo Quick, Director of Mission Services for OSF HealthCare Little Company of Mary Medical Center, said it was important to have a prayerful way for both congregations to share the history of their communities, light a candle in front of a photo of each Foundress, and from there light a single candle, together, to symbolize the two communities coming together and continuing to provide care for those they have been called to serve. 

The Little Company of Mary Sisters are dedicated to caring for the suffering, the sick and the dying. The order was founded in 1877 in Nottingham, England by Venerable Mary Potter. The Sisters of the Third Order of St. Francis were founded in Peoria, Illinois on July 16, 1877, by Mother M. Frances Krasse, O.S.F., the first Major Superior of the religious community, and Bishop John Lancaster Spalding, the first Bishop of the Catholic Diocese of Peoria. They are committed to serving the sick, the poor, and all those the Lord sends their way with the greatest care and love.
With the addition of Little Company of Mary, OSF HealthCare employs 23,678 Mission Partners at more than 147 locations including 14 hospitals.  

OSF HealthCare Little Company of Mary Medical Center operates 12 unique facilities, including the hospital, 2800 W. 95th St., which has strong community connections. Learn more at www.osfhealthcare.org/little-company-of-mary.  

 

 

Crystal Heart Ball Raises $450k for OSF Little Company of Mary   Emergency Department Modernization

 

Crystal Heart Ball Raises $450k for OSF Little Company of Mary 
Emergency Department Modernization 

The OSF HealthCare Foundation Little Company of Mary Medical Center hosted the 30th annual Crystal Heart Ball on Feb. 1 at the Field Museum raising $450,000, with proceeds benefitting OSF Little Company of Mary’s Emergency Department modernization project. 

More than 670 guests danced the night away to the musical stylings by Maggie Speaks – Talk of the Town Big Band, while experiencing international cultures and artifacts from around the worldThe Master of Ceremonies for the evening was Nancy Loo, WGN News reporter.  

Each year, the Crystal Heart Ball showcases individuals and organizations for their outstanding accomplishments and service. The Venerable Mary Potter Humanitarian Award honors those whose personal and professional accomplishments embody the ideas, vision and mission of Venerable Mary Potter, who founded the Little Company of Mary Sisters in 1877.  

This year, the honoree was Patrick Elwood – a Little Company of Mary baby alum, Crystal Heart Ball Master of Ceremonies since 2012, and a general assignment reporter for WGN News. Elwood was honored for his work with the St. Baldrick’s Foundation and the REACT4Ryan Foundation. REACT is the Lt. Ryan Elwood Awareness, Counseling and Training Fund for First Responders in need of mental health and emotional assistance. 

Lindsay and Chris Vandenberg chaired this year’s event along with co-chairs Laura and Sushant Taksande, MDThe Foundation raffled a Grand Prize Luxury Vacation for two to Bora Bora, or $15,000, won by John Graham of Lake Forest. 

Click Here to learn more about the OSF HealthCare Foundation, including how to make a donation to OSF Little Company of Mary Medical CenterFor more information on OSF HealthCare Little Company of Mary Medical Centervisit www.osflittlecompanyofmary.org     

5 Dangers of Drinking and Driving 

By Kathryn M. Cavanaugh, RN, MSN 
Manager/Health Promotions 
Little Company of Mary Hospital 

Getting behind the wheel of a vehicle after consuming alcohol is not only a serious crime, it’s very dangerous. Alcohol has a substantial effect on a person’s judgement, coordination, reaction time, concentration and vision.  Any amount of alcohol in your bloodstream can impact your driving ability, putting you at risk for causing an accident.   

Following are five dangers of drinking and driving 

Poor JudgementAlcohol clouds judgement. Loss of judgement when intoxicated can leave you more prone to distraction and less able to make good decisions.  Driving skills are also impacted, such as the ability to judge the distance needed to stop in time, or to make a turn without hitting anything. Having a clear head helps your judgement by keeping you alert and aware of the conditions around you. Alcohol will impair this ability. 

Slowed Reaction Time & Lack of CoordinationHaving alcohol in your system causes your body to react more slowly to certain situations.  The likelihood of an accident increases because you won’t be able to respond to something happening as quickly as you would if you were sober. A brain under the influence of alcohol takes longer to process a situation and react. Coordination skills are crucial for being able to safely drive a car, and if they are impaired, you will be putting yourself and others in danger. 

Decreased VisionDrinking may cause your vision to blur, or you might even lose control over your eye movement. This vision impairment can influence how you are able to judge the distance between your car and other vehicles or objects on the road. You might even lose your peripheral vision, which plays a very important role in safe driving.  

Increased Likelihood of Having an AccidentThere are about 10,000 deaths caused by alcohol-related crashes each year in the United States. Alcohol plays a role in roughly one in every three motor vehicle deaths in this country. Motor vehicle deaths are the leading killer of people under the age of 24, whether they are a driver or a passenger. No one should drive after consuming alcohol. This is the only way to protect yourself from the consequences of drinking and driving.  

Potential Legal RamificationsAnyone who chooses to drink and drive is putting themselves at risk for serious legal consequences. Beyond the legal penalties, offenders will also be subject to substantial financial penalties.  

The dangers of drinking and driving far outweigh the reward of chancing that you will get home safely. Safely driving a car is difficult even when you are sober, but adding alcohol into the mix is putting your life and the lives of others on the road at risk. Make sure that you make the right choice and don’t attempt to drive drunk.  

Top Programs This Month 

Little Company of Mary Hospital 

2800 W. 95th St. Registration:  7084235774. 

CHEER (Choices, Humor, Enhancement, Education, Renewal) covers outdoor activities and safety in “Winter Wonderland: The Art of Keeping Cozy,” Wed., Dec. 11, 11 a.m. to 12 p.m.Cancer Center. Free. 

Assess your risk for heart disease and stroke with a Wake-Up Call Screening Sat., Dec. 14. Includes healthy heart labs, ultrasound of abdominal aorta and carotid arteries, peripheral vascular screening and heart rhythm screening for atrial fibrillation, plus personalized visit with wellness nurse educator and kidney health screening. Payment required at registration. Fee: $160 ($5,500 value). 

Hand/Wrist Screening with LCMH board certified orthopedic surgeon Ramsey Ellis, MD, Tues., Dec. 17. Free. 

Healthy Heart Screening including CBC with differential, chemistry, blood sugar, cholesterol profile, thyroid, hs-CRP, BP and BMI, plus kidney health screening to determine the amount of protein in the urine. Monday through Thursday, two locations. By appointment only. Fee: $70 ($2,500 value).   

LCMH Foundation to Host 30th Annual Crystal Heart Ball

The Little Company of Mary Hospital (LCMH) Foundation will host the 30th Annual Crystal Heart Ball on Sat., Feb. 1 at the Field Museum.

The Venerable Mary Potter Humanitarian Award will be presented to Patrick Elwood. The award honors individuals whose personal and professional accomplishments embody the ideas, vision and mission of Venerable Mary Potter, who founded the Little Company of Mary Sisters in 1877.

Elwood, a Little Company of Mary baby alum, was a Master of Ceremonies for the Crystal Heart Ball since 2012. Since 2013, he has been a general assignment reporter for WGN-TV News. Prior to joining WGN-TV, Elwood worked for major TV and radio stations in Houston, Corpus Christi, Oklahoma City and Milwaukee before returning to his hometown of Chicago. His career highlights include covering the White Sox World Series, two Blackhawks Championships, the Bears Super Bowl and the Oklahoma City Bombing, for which he earned a Peabody Award.

Elwood lives in Chicago with his wife Katie, where they have raised four children. While Elwood is well known for his work reporting on TV news, he credits his biggest accomplishment as the work he’s done with the St. Baldrick’s Foundation, for which he, along with thousands of Chicago school kids, has raised more than $12 million for pediatric cancer research.

Following the suicide of his nephew, fire fighter Lt. Ryan Elwood in 2015, Elwood and his wife founded RE; ACT, an organization that helps fire fighters and other first responders in need of mental health services and emotional assistance. RE; ACT stands for Ryan Elwood; Awareness, Counseling and Training Fund for First Responders.

Proceeds from the 30th Annual Crystal Heart Ball will benefit the Emergency Department Modernization Project at LCMH. LCMH broke ground on this project in Aug. 2019 and it is slated to take two years to complete. The project will feature a renovated emergency department with improved efficiency and patient throughput and will use environmentally-friendly materials that will enhance patient privacy and safety and reduce noise. The project includes a dedicated fast track area, dedicated behavioral health suite and more.

In January 2020, LCMH will be celebrating 90 years of healthcare ministry. This significant milestone will be commemorated at the Crystal Heart Ball.

A drawing will be offered at the Ball with a 1st prize luxury vacation to Bora Bora for two or $15,000; 2nd prize of $5,000; 3rd prize of $2,500; and 4th prize of $1,000. Raffle tickets are $100 each.

Crystal Heart Ball tickets are $350 per person. Guests also may purchase a Diamond Table for $10,000, a Heart of Gold Table for $6,500 or a Crystal Heart Table for $3,500, each offering unique benefits.

To learn more or to purchase event or raffle tickets, contact the Little Company of Mary Hospital Foundation, 708.229.5447 or www.LCMH.org/foundation.

Your Health: Living Well With Congestive Heart Failure 

By Kathryn Cavanaugh, MSN, RN 
Manager Health PromotionsLittle Company of Mary Hospital 

The term “heart failure” can be very daunting when your doctor tells you that you have this significant health challenge.  Congestive heart failure (CHF) is a very common medical condition that varies widely from person to person and can be managed effectively with medications and lifestyle changes. Simply put, heart failure occurs when the heart muscle becomes unable to pump blood to the lungs where it picks up oxygen to carry to other muscles and systems of the body. Indications of CHF include tiredness, dizziness, swelling of the legs and ankles (edema) with sudden weight gain over a period of days, shortness of breath and cough due to a build-up of fluid in the lungs. Common causes of CHF include high blood pressure, diabetes and coronary artery disease. The good news is that the problem develops gradually and can be managed with medications and lifestyle changes. Here are a few tips to help you accomplish that goal. 

Watch your salt intake. This is very effective in lowering blood pressure and helping to eliminate fluid from the body. High blood pressure is a serious risk for developing heart failure. 

Maintain a healthy weight. Carrying around that extra weight puts a strain on your heart. Losing as little as 10% of your body weight can make a huge difference on the overall health of your cardiovascular system. 

Follow a healthy heart diet. Incorporate healthy fats in your diet, such as plant oils (i.e. olive oil) and omega-3 fatty acids (i.e. fish) and load up on whole grains, vegetables and fruits. One thing to keep in mind is that you may need to restrict your fluids to less than 1.5 liters per day. This is about five  8-ounce servings. 

Keep track of your body. Weigh yourself and take your blood pressure every day. If you gain more than three to five pounds in a matter of days or notice your blood pressure creeping up, call your doctor. 

Take your medications. Your doctor will work closely with you to determine the medications that work best for you. Take medications as prescribed. If you have concerns about the medications, talk with your doctor before you make any changes. 

Little Company of Mary Hospital has a Heart Failure Clinic that works with you and your doctor to keep you out of the hospital and managing your symptoms successfully at home. For more information, call 7082294278 

Top November Programs  

Little Company of Mary Hospital, 2800 W. 95th St. Registration: 7084235774   

CHEER (Choices, Humor, Enhancement, Education, Renewal) “Relax and Regroup Singing Crystal Bowls,” Wed., Nov. 13, 11 a.m. to 12 p.m. Free. 

Calcium Scoring Screening, noninvasive CT scan of the heart to calculate risk of developing coronary artery disease by measuring the amount of calcified plaque in the coronary arteries, Thurs., Nov. 14Fee: $99. 

Wake-Up Call Screening to assess risk for heart disease and stroke, Sat., Nov. 16. Includes healthy heart labs, ultrasound screening of abdominal aorta and carotid arteries, peripheral vascular screening, heart rhythm screening for atrial fibrillation, kidney health screening and personalized visit with wellness nurse educator. Payment required at time of registration. Fee: $160. 

Skin Cancer Screeningtenminute screening for one area of concern with Sonya Kenkare, M.D., board certified dermatologistThurs., Nov. 21. Free. 

 

 

 

Think FAST to Recognize Signs of Stroke

Eileen McNichols MSN, RN
Director, Pastoral Care Services and Community Health Little Company of Mary Hospital

May is the month that we really believe summer is coming. In healthcare, we celebrate May as National Stroke Awareness month. With early recognition and management, the number of people surviving stroke with improved functionality is steadily improving. The old saying “knowledge is power” is certainly true when it comes to stroke. The more people are aware of risk factors , signs and symptoms, and appropriate response to stroke, the more likely we are to prevent and manage stroke in such a way that quality of life is enhanced.

According to the American Stroke Association, “most strokes are preventable and a large percentage of the ones that happen are treatable with the right care, right away. It’s a matter of knowing what to do, taking action and spreading the word.” The risk factors for stroke include high blood pressure, high cholesterol, smoking, diabetes, carotid artery and peripheral vascular disease, atrial fibrillation and sickle cell disease. Working with your primary care provider to manage these risk factors decreases the chances that you will have a stroke.

Recently, stroke has gone from the third to the fourth leading cause of death in the U.S. which is monumental achievement. If you can remember the phrase Think FAST, you can be a stroke champion and help to continue the success of minimizing the number of people who experience stroke, maximizing early access to care and improving the quality of life for stroke victims.

FACE: Drooping on one side of the face. Ask the person to smile.
ARM: Weakness on one side. Ask the person to raise both arms. Does one arm drift downward?
SPEECH: Slurred speech. Is the person unable to speak or hard to understand?
TIME: If someone shows any of these symptoms, even if the symptoms go away, call 9-1-1 to get the person to the hospital immediately. Treatment that begins within 4.5 hours of the first sign of a stroke results in the best outcome.

Little Company of Mary Hospital is a primary stroke center, recognized by the Joint Commission of Hospital Accreditation as a place where stroke patients receive excellent care. To learn your personal risk factors for stroke, sign up for the Wake Up Call screening. You can help prevent stroke and its long term consequences if you remember to Think FAST.

Top Programs in May
Little Company of Mary Hospital, 2800 W. 95th St. Registration: 708-423-5774.

Health Academy — Updates on Stroke Management from the Experts: A Panel Presentation, Mon., May 13, 11 a.m. to noon. Free.
CHEER puts the power of humor to work in your life with “Live, Laugh, Love,” Wed., May 15, 11 a.m. to noon. Free.
Wake Up Call screening, Sat., May 18, 7:30 to 11:30 a.m., a one-hour screening that could save your life. Includes lab work, ultrasounds of the carotid and abdominal aortic arteries, peripheral vascular screening, heart rhythm screening and more. Appointment required. $160.
Free blood pressure screenings, every Tues. and Thurs., 10:30 a.m. to noon, West Pavilion outside the Women’s Center. No appointment required.

Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is something that can strike fear in the hearts of parents.

By Eileen McNichols, Director of Community Health and Pastoral Care Services 

ASD is a developmental disorder that usually appears in early childhood. The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual fifth edition (DSM-5) defines ASD as a disorder that includes communication difficulty, restricted behavior and interference with life activities. 

The severity of symptoms varies greatly.  

Although ASD is not something a child outgrows, it is treatable. The most important piece of information to know about ASD is that the earlier it is identified and intervention begins, the better the outcome for the child.  

There is no known cause of autism.  

The National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) identifies five behaviors that warrant further evaluation of young children: 

Child does not babble or coo by 12 months. 

Child does not gesture (point, wave, grasp) by 12 months. 

Child does not say single words by 16 months. 

Child does not say two-word phrases on his or her own by 24 months. 

Child has any loss of any language or social skill at any age. 

If a child exhibits any of these behaviors it does not necessarily mean that child has ASD. Regular follow up with a primary care provider who can track a child’s development and help to identify any areas of concern is critical for a child’s wellbeing. If you have any concerns about the children in your life, talk to their primary care provider. Remember, the earlier ASD is identified and intervention begins, the better the outcome for the child.  

Little Company of Mary Hospital has a team of experienced pediatric providers along with the presence of University of Chicago pediatric subspecialists to monitor and address any health pediatric concerns you may have about the children in your life. For a full list of children’s health specialists visit LCMH.org/UCM.  

Top Programs in June 

Little Company of Mary Hospital, 2800 W. 95th St. Info/registration: 708-423-5774. 

In Balance: The Ups and Downs of Blood Pressure, presented by Charles Lawler, MD, Thurs., June 7, 1:30 to 2:30 p.m., North Pavilion Link, Room N1703. Free. 

Health Academy: The Bottom Line on Women’s Health, presented by gynecologist Marjorie Michel, MD, Mon., June 11, 11 a.m. to noon, North Pavilion Link, Room N1703. Free.  

Family Fun Nights: music, activities, food and fun for young families at neighborhood Metra stations, Thursdays, 5:30 to 7 p.m., June 14, 91st Street Station/Maggie Cosme Park; June 21, 99th Street Station; and June 28, 111th Street Station/Bohn Park. Events are held weather-permitting. Bring chairs and blankets. Free admission. Look for details in this issue of The Villager.  

Wake Up Call Screening, Sat., June 23, 7:30 a.m. to noon, by appointment. Assess your risk for heart disease and stroke. Includes comprehensive labs, ultrasound screening of abdominal aorta and carotid arteries, peripheral vascular screening, heart rhythm screening for atrial fibrillation and more.  LCMH Cancer Center. $155 ($4,000 value). Appointments required.  

Your Health: Think FAST…

By Eileen McNichols, Director, Community Health and Pastoral Care, Little Company of Mary Hospital

Finally! The weather is warm and sunny. The flowers are in bloom and the grass needs mowing.  As we become more physically engaged and spend more time together talking over the fence, sitting on the porch and catching up after a long winter, let’s remember that we can make a difference in the health and well-being of our community.

Stroke is a serious health situation for which the treatment has dramatically improved. The number of people surviving stroke with improved functionality is steadily improving as well. The old saying “knowledge is power” is certainly true when it comes to stroke. The more people are aware of risk factors , signs and symptoms, and appropriate response to stroke, the more likely we are to prevent and manage stroke in such a way that quality of life is enhanced.

According to the American Stroke Association, “most strokes are preventable and a large percentage of the ones that happen are treatable with the right care, right away. It’s a matter of knowing what to do, taking action and spreading the word.” The risk factors for stroke include high blood pressure, high cholesterol, smoking, diabetes, carotid artery and peripheral vascular disease, atrial fibrillation and sickle cell disease. Working with your primary care provider to manage these risk factors decreases the chances that you will have a stroke.

Recently, stroke has gone from the third to the fourth leading cause of death in the U.S., which is a monumental achievement.  If you can remember the phrase “Think FAST,” you can help to continue the success of minimizing the number of people who experience stroke, maximizing early access to care and improving the quality of life for stroke victims.

FAST helps you remember the symptoms to look for and the actions to take.

FACE: Drooping on one side of the face. Ask the person to smile.

ARM: Weakness on one side. Ask the person to raise both arms. Does one arm drift downward?

SPEECH: Slurred speech. Is the person unable to speak or hard to understand?

TIME:  If someone shows any of these symptoms, even if the symptoms go away, call 9-1-1 to get the person to the hospital immediately. Treatment that begins within three to four hours of the first sign of a stroke results in the best outcome.

Little Company of Mary Hospital is a primary stroke center, recognized by the Joint Commission of Hospital Accreditation as a place where stroke patients receive excellent care.  To learn your personal risk factors for stroke, enroll in the comprehensive Wake Up Call screening program at Little Company of Mary Hospital. You can be a champion to prevent stroke and its long term consequences if you remember to “think F.A.S.T.”.

June Programs, Little Company of Mary Hospital, 2800 W. 95th St. Call to register: 708-423-5774

Health Academy presents Small Gland Big Problems: Thyroid Health with endocrinologist, Ammar Bayrakdar, MD, Mon., June 12,  11:15 a.m. to noon. Free.

Skin Cancer Screening with dermatologist Arash Koochek, MD, Thurs., June 15, 1:30 to 3:30 p.m., Health Education Center. Free. Appointment required.

Babysitting Safe and Secure, a class in safe babysitting practices for children age 11 to 14 learn, Mon., June 19, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., Beverly Area Planning Association Community Room, 11109 S. Longwood Dr. $60. Reservation required.

Wake Up Call Screening, one hour screening that includes lab work, ultrasounds of the abdominal aorta and carotid arteries, peripheral vascular screening, heart rhythm screening and more, Sat., June 24, 7:30 to 11:30 a.m., Cancer Center. Appointment required. $155 (value $4,000).

 

Village Viewpoint

Dear Friends and Neighbors,

Happy Spring! As we welcome spring, we remember that this is a great time in our community! As our neighborhood trees and gardens come back to life, a new baseball season begins and graduation draws near for our students.

Here at BAPA spring is our most exciting time of year, packed with our biggest community events — the 46th edition of the Beverly/Morgan Park Home Tour and 40th annual Ridge Run and Memorial Day parade. These events have been bedrocks of our community for more than a generation, and they keep getting better!

We are a community that takes great pride in our homes and the Beverly/Morgan Park Home Tour on May 21st, gives us a lot to be proud about! The tour celebrates all the beautiful homes in our community, and this year will feature two of our neighborhood’s Frank Lloyd Wright homes as well as a tiny house built by the students at the Chicago High School for Agricultural Sciences, along with three other area homes that are each special in their own way and historic Ridge Park, where the tour begins.

We are so thankful to the committee of volunteers that plans this popular event and to the generous homeowners who open and share their homes with us. A special highlight is that there will be experiences at each home to enjoy, from mini golf to mead tastings and docents who specialize in Frank Lloyd Wright. Do not miss this event!

Those of you who know me, know I am runner and love to run in different races supporting different causes. The Ridge Run has long been my favorite race!  I remember being engaged to my now husband and feeling so much pride to bring him out to experience the Ridge Run and the community where I grew up. Now, our family is up and ready to go to Ridge Park and compete in different races — from the 10K and 5K to the youth mile, the Hollands will be there and soaking up the community and competition! This event is a must even if you are not a runner! You can volunteer on the course or in the park. Runners and walkers certainly don’t want to miss this awesome event — we have a 40th annual Ridge Run commemorative finisher medal, post-race festival for the whole family, and lots more! Sign your team up today at www.bapa.org

I am so thankful for the support of the Ridge Run committee but especially our presenting sponsor, Little Company of Mary Hospital.  Each year they come through with support from their amazing staff of doctors and nurses to ensure a safe run for all to enjoy, however more than that they are a pillar in this community providing health care to our residents 365 days a year! Thank you Little Company of Mary for your support of BAPA, the Ridge Run and all of Beverly Hills Morgan Park!

Don’t miss out on the fun and please join us for these great community events!  For more information on tickets and registration please check out our website, bapa.org or call my office at 773-233-3100.

— Margot Holland, BAPA Executive Director