New Ideas for Vintage Homes

BAPA Home Tour + Home Expo Give Before-and-After Insights to Gracious Living

On Sun., May 19, the old and the new come together as the Beverly Area Planning Association (BAPA) launches the new Home Expo on the morning of the popular Beverly/Morgan Park Home Tour. Together, the events offer before-and-after insights to gracious neighborhood living.

The BAPA Home Expo will take place at Bethany Union Church, 1750 W. 103rd St., Chicago, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., and the Home Tour will start at the same location, with tour check-in and ticket sales 12 to 3 p.m. Home Tour locations are open 12 to 5 p.m.

BAPA Home Expo

Designed to give property owners a range of accessible expert advice, the Home Expo invites attendees to talk to interior designers, wood restoration experts, people who offer eco-friendly services, and companies that offer roofing (including slate roofing), heating and air conditioning, plumbing, decks, landscape design, composting, paint and more.

People considering home projects are welcome to participate in the AIA Chicago Ask and Architect program that connects residential architects with homeowners looking to expand or improve their homes. Bungalows, two-flats, or new construction—architects will be standing by with free, personalized advice.  The architects will be available for short consultations on a first come/first served. Bring plans, drawings, ideas, or any other pertinent information so the architects can assist in the best possible way.

The Chicago Bungalow Association will present information on its Stop the Pop campaign that encourages bungalow owners who are planning home additions to maintain the exterior integrity of the original architectural design. This presentation, scheduled for 10:15 a.m., can benefit all property owners who are considering additions.

Oak Brothers Architectural Restoration will present information on restoring and caring for vintage windows, woodwork and architectural elements at 11 a.m. The Oak Brothers are specialists in repairing original windows, providing custom millwork and hand carving, refurbishing vintage hardware, plaster repair and more.

Representatives from the Citizens Utility Board will be available with tips on saving money on utility bills, CHI 311 will provide information on Chicago’s expanded 311 service and the new easy-to-use 311 app, and the Chicago Metropolitan Water Reclamation District will offer a variety of service information and give away 100 free tree saplings.

BAPA Home Expo admission and presentations are free. The Expo is open 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.

Beverly/Morgan Park Home Tour

This year’s Beverly/Morgan Park Home Tour takes a look at how savvy renovations, inspired decorating, new construction and down-to-the studs restoration add an exciting variety to traditional architectural designs in the historic Beverly/Morgan Park community.

The Home Tour begins at Bethany Union Church, 1750 W. 103rd St. The sanctuary was designed by noted architect Raymond M. Hood soon after he won the contest to design the Chicago Tribune Tower, and erected in 1926. It features carefully preserved Norman Gothic details and as well as a cloister Garth paved with Hudson River blue stone and featuring an open-air stone pulpit. Founded in 1872, Bethany Union Church will also be sharing artifacts and information about it’s long and interesting local history.

Homes being showcased on the tour are:

A stunning home built just ten years ago and designed with an English Eclectic influence that fits beautifully into the vintage character of the surrounding neighborhood. Inside the house is a spectacular combination of vintage amenities, contemporary lifestyle and carefully incorporated elements that make the house handicapped accessible to accommodate the needs of aging parents. From the basement party room with its expansive bar and sparkling disco ball to the perfect-for-entertaining open floor plan kitchen and family room to the fully furnished patio, this house was designed with welcome in mind. Experiences in this house include the Calumet Paint/Benjamin Moore Interior Paint Showcase and a beverage sampling in the back yard.

A handsome French Eclectic home designed by Murray Hetherington and built in 1935 on a secluded lot nestled at the edge of the forest preserves. The home offers a seamless meshing of original construction and renovation projects including a spacious addition with design-perfect details that incorporate original exterior brick and windows that match the unique windows in the front of the house that are protected as historic. Artwork throughout the house has been collected on family vacations and selected for its beauty, diverse media and styles, and as reminders of world travels. Experiences in this house include plein air painting by artist Judie Anderson.

A charming Mediterranean Revival with a brand new, custom-designed kitchen that combines function with contemporary beauty. This welcoming home is filled with elements including lovely casement windows and woodwork, decorating that uses a rich and warm palette of colors, and extensive collections of African American art and literature. Experiences in this house include tastings from guest chefs.

A stately North Beverly Georgian Revival with a warm and welcoming traditional appeal carried through from the original home into a stunning two-story addition. Be prepared to “ooh” and “aah” as every room features styles and decorating that make it special: the gorgeous fireplace in the sunken living room, the elegant dining room with its faux painting; the spacious master suite with walk in closet and spa bath, the comfortable family room that opens into a three-season room; even the cozy TV-room for two! Experiences at this house include beverage tastings on the deck.

A special feature of the Home Tour is the Longwood Drive historic home once owned by Paul Harris, founder of Rotary International, the global organization dedicated to taking action on some of the world’s most persistent issues. The house is currently undergoing a cellar-to-rooftop restoration by Rotary, bringing it back to what it was like when Harris lived there in the 1940s. Members of the Rotary Club will act as guides, offering insights into the home’s fascinating history and its amazing transformation back in time. Experiences include a candy tasting.

Home Tour attendees will get a chance to walk through each of these outstanding sites for an up-close look at the details of design, decorating, art collections and lifestyle that make each of them a unique example of gracious living in Beverly/Morgan Park – the Village in the City.

Many thanks to Home Tour sponsors including Mike Haggerty Buick-GMC-Volkswagen, Beverly Bank, Calumet Paint and Wallpaper, Beverly Hills Animal Hospital, Southtown Health Foods, County Fair Foods, PRS professional real estate services, Berkshire Hathaway Home Services – Biros Real Estate, Benjamin Moore Paint, Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage, Solution 3 Graphics, Pacor Mortgage, Green Apple Cleaning, 19th Ward Youth Foundation, The Beverly Review, Smith Village, Horse Thief Hollow, Open Outcry Brewing Co., Sweet Freaks, The Blossom Boys, Steuber Florist & Greenhouse, RMH Interiors + Design, The Music Scene, Nine-One-One BBQ Shack and Chef Alvin Green.

For more than four decades, BAPA’s Beverly/Morgan Park Home Tour has been opening the doors to some of the neighborhood’s most remarkable private residences. Home Tour tickets are $30 in advance and available at Steuber Florist, 2654 W. 111th St., The Blossom Boys, 1810 W. 103rd St., Sweet Freaks, 9927 S. Wood St., and County Fair, 10800 S. Western (cash or checks only) or online at www.bapa.org. The price increases to $35 on the day of the tour. Home Tour locations are open from 12 to 5 p.m. All tours are self-guided and must begin by 3 p.m.

Information about the BAPA Home Expo and or Beverly/Morgan Park Home Tour contact BAPA, 773-233-3100 or bapa@bapa.org,

Art Fair & Festival Returns to Ridge Park this Summer 

The 2nd annual Ridge Park Art Fair & Festival will take place Sat., June 22, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., at the Ridge Park Cultural Center, 9625 S. Longwood Dr. The event is being planned by the Ridge Park Advisory Council (RPAC) and John H. Vanderpoel Art Association along with the Chicago Park District and will highlight cultural opportunities in Beverly/Morgan Park. 

The Ridge Park Art Fair & Festival will feature Chicago area artists working across a wide variety of media, selling original paintings, sculptures, textiles, photographs, jewelry, art glass, leatherwork and moreThe registration deadline for artists is Apr. 15 

The art fair debut last year was a resounding success, with more than 40 participating artists and a host of activities. According to art fair planners, the festivities will be expanded this year to include more artists, more live music, more kid-friendly options and more food trucks. 

As a Chicago Park District cultural center, Ridge Park offers rich and dynamic programming that will be highlighted throughout the art fair and festival. The John H. Vanderpoel Museum is located in the fieldhouse through the Chicago Park District’s Arts Partners in Residency Program, which unites artists and communities in Chicago’s parks. The Museum hosts a world-class collection of Impressionist paintings and other late 19th and early 20th century paintings and works on paper. Ridge Park Art Fair attendees will have the opportunity to take guided tours of the Vanderpoel Museum, as well as of the park facilities and ceramics studio. 

Information about the Ridge Park Art Fair & Festival is available at www.ridgeparkartfair.org. Donations and sponsorships are still available. For more information, contact Irene Testa,irene@vanderpoelartmuseum.org, or Mary Jo Viero, mjviero@yahoo.com 

Got a Project? Get a Permit

 

By Liam Millerick 
BAPA Housing Program Coordinator 

With spring here and summer just around the corner, many homeowners may be looking at making some slight alterations to their homes. One big concern is deciding whether to obtain a permit.  

A safe rule is to contact the city’s Building Department and check. However, here is a helpful guide building permits.  

Obtaining a permit from the city, when required, is an important step and failing to do so can have costly consequences. Homeowners who start construction on a permit-required projects without first obtaining a permit face the city issuing a stop work order, which immediately haltall construction. Work can then only be restarted after obtaining the permit and paying a penalty of $1,000. In some cases, work that was illegally completed will be removed. If a homeowner continues to violate permit protocols, they may face a fine of $1,000 per day of violation, up to 100 hours of community service and imprisonment for up to 6 months.  

Navigating the world of city building permit requirements can be complicated, so let’s begin with an outline of what projects a typical homeowner may wish to complete that don’t require permits.  

  • Most interior projects, like carpeting, hardwood flooring, tiling, painting and wallpapering 
  • Cabinetry without an electrical component 
  • Replacing windows and doors, as long as they are the same size and in the same location as the original windows and doors 
  • Replacing plumbing features, as long as they are the same size and in the same location as the original features 
  • Replacing siding 
  • Replacing toilets, sinks, faucets and tubs 
  • Replacing up to 250 bricks. 
  • Shingle work for roofs with a slope of 5 in 12 inches or steeper 
  • Building non-brick or non-chain link fences, up to 5 feet tall. 
  • Building gazebos, up to 150 sq. ft., as long as they comply with all zoning and construction requirements. 
  • Building an enclosed shed, up to 70 sq. ft., as long as they comply with all zoning and construction requirements. (One enclosed shed allowed per lot.) 
  • Up to 1,000 sq. ft. of drywall, as long as there is no alteration to the structural, plumbing, electrical or ventilation systems.  
  • Porches less than 50 sq. ft., excluding the steps, with a maximum of six feet between the ground level and the floor of the porch.  

It’s important to note that some of these projects that don’t require permits are conditional on the property itself. If your home is a designated Chicago landmark or is located in a Chicago Landmark District, you must obtain permission from the city before you replace siding, replace doors and windows, build fences, build porches or replace bricks. This is to preserve the historical significance of the buildings. 

The Chicago Department of Buildings issues many different types of permits, depending on what type of work being done and the size of the project. The city has experts who can guide you through the permit process, which can be tricky to navigate on your own.  

Here is a quick list of common home improvement projects that need permits. 

  • Installing insulation 
  • Installing light fixtures 
  • Installing porches and decks larger than 50 sq. ft.  
  • Building a garage 
  • Installing a green roof, solar panels, skylights, a chimney, dormers, or fixing a roof with a slope less than 5 in 12 inches 
  • Moving windows or doors, moving or removing walls 
  • Installing more than 1,000 sq. ft. of drywall, installing a boiler, furnace, or hot water heater 
  • Installing electrical, ventilation, security, irrigation, or plumbing systems 
  • Finishing or renovating a basement or attic 
  • Home additions, gut rehabs or wrecking 
  • Installing stairs or non-brick or non-chain link fences over 5 feet tall 

You’re the Boss When it Comes to Healthcare

By Eileen McNichols, Little Company of Mary Hospital

Most adults prefer to make important decisions about their life for themselves. Not that you don’t seek input from trusted friends and family members, a pastor or other personal counselor, but ultimately the decision is yours. This is known as autonomy. When it comes to healthcare, autonomy means the right of a competent adult to make informed decisions about their own medical care.

Typically, you don’t ponder the intricacies of medical care when you are doing well. However, when crisis occurs, you may be compromised intellectually, emotionally and spiritually. Is this the best time to make decisions that can affect the rest of your life? If you were to become incapacitated, does anyone know what your preferences in a difficult medical situation would be? Would your spouse or adult child be comfortable or have the emotional ability to make a decision about medical care on your behalf if you were incapacitated?

While this may seem like a difficult topic to throw out at the dinner table, consider the alternative: Living a life in a compromised state in which you no longer have control over what is happening to you. Give your loved ones a valuable gift. Relieve them of the burden of making these difficult decisions. Make them yourself.

National Health Care Decision Week is Apr. 15-21.  Utilize this week as an opportunity to have a conversation with a trusted person about your preferences for healthcare. Complete a Healthcare Power of Attorney (HCPOA) document and designate a trusted person to be your healthcare agent, your voice if you cannot speak for yourself. This form is simple to fill out yet will play a crucial role should the time come when it is needed. You do not need an attorney and the document does not need to be notarized. This form simply ensures that your preferences will drive the decisions that need to be made about your medical care.

On Sat., Apr. 13, 2to 3 p.m., Little Company of Mary Hospital, 2800 W. 95th St., will hold a free seminar on Durable Power of Attorney for Healthcare Seminar. For information or to register, call 708- 4223-5774. For more information, and to access a simple HCPOA to download and complete, visit www.lcmh.org/yourchoice.  In other words, no matter what happens, and God willing nothing will happen, You’re the Boss.

More April Programs at Little Company of Mary Hospital (info/registration: 708-423-5774)

Annual Adult Health Fair, Sat., Apr. 6, 7:30 to 10 a.m., comprehensive lab work including a take home colon rectal screening kits. Learn about our Primary Stroke Center, how to minimize your risk of having a stroke and what to do if you suspect someone is having a stroke. Fee $75. Registration required.

Health Academy: “Here We Go Again – Updates on Colon Health,” Mon., Apr. 8, p 11 a.m. to noon, presented by Dr. Michael Hurtuk. Little Company of Mary Hospital. Free.

Skin Cancer Screening with Dr. Sonya Kenkare, Thurs., Apr. 18, 1 to 3 p.m. Free. If you have an area of concern, Dr. Kenkare will exam and provide guidance to prevent melanoma. Registration required

 

 

BAPA and Running Excels Launch Ridge Run 5K Walk to Run Program   

BAPA and Running Excels are launching a Ridge Run 5K Walk to Run program designed to get non-runners from the couch to the starting line on Memorial Day, Mon., May 27.   

Specifically designed by Running Excels for walkers, the eightweek plan starts Sat., Apr. 6 and breaks down, week by week, a walker’s journey to becoming a runner. Participants will meet at Running Excels, 10328 S. Western, on Saturdays for group walk/runs led by experienced running specialists, including Running Excels owner Beverly Lynch and nine-time marathon finisher, Stephanie Ramirez.   

The power of a program combined with the support of a group is unstoppableand this plan will get walkers started off on the right foot, according to Ramirez.   

Running can be intimidating, she explained, but this program is specifically designed for beginners and includes information sessions, weekly encouragement emails and Q&As, along with local business partnerships and discounts.   

People interested in joining up for the chance to improve their fitnessparticipate in Beverly/Morgan Park’s iconic Ridge Run and have some fun along the way can sign up at www.bapa.orgThe cost is $100. Sign up with a friend and save $10 each by using the code Buddy.  

Wil Turner is Brewmaster at Open Outcry 

By Kristin Boza 

Craft beer fans are bubbling with excitement over the addition of Wil Turner as Head Brewer/Director of Brewing Operations at Open Outcry Brewing Co., 10934 S. Western Ave. 

Turner, of Evergreen Park, brings his brewing knowledge to the south side after decades of experience with beer all over the world. As a teenager growing up in Switzerland, Turner was able to legally imbibe at a younger age than U.S. citizens, which gave him a leg up on developing a palette for different kinds of brews. He moved to California as a young man, right when Sam Adams, Sierra Nevada and other brewers were starting to develop their craft beers.  

“I wasn’t old enough to drink yet in the states, but was old enough to work retail and talk about and sell beer,” Turner said. “I started home brewing in 1992 in Santa Cruz and moved to Chicago 17 years ago to take a job with Goose Island.” 

At the time, Goose Island was just a brewpub and Turner ran the pub side of the business. Eventually, as Goose Island began producing beer in greater quantities and varieties, Turner earned a promotion to Senior Brewer and began to experience the production side of beer. As Goose Island expanded its operations and reputation, Turner landed a position at Revolution Brewing, which at the time was a start-up brewpub.  

“My previous experiences are all similar to what I’m doing now. I had the opportunity to grow with Revolution and that’s what I’m looking to do at Open Outcry,” he said. “Open Outcry has something good going, and it will be one of the south side beer destinations and a good anchor for the brewing community down here. With Goose and Revolution, I was allowed a lot of creativity so that enabled me to experiment with different beer styles from all over the world; I’m hoping to bring that creativity here and bring some of the large brewery consistency to the products we create.” 

Currently, Turner is working to ensure consistency among Open Outcry’s staple beers, like Open Interest, a New England IPA. “I took John’s (Brand, owner of Open Outcry) recipe and made a couple of tweaks and now we’ve hit on a recipe we all enjoy. I want to make sure that every time someone drinks Open Interest, it tastes like Open Interest,” Turner said. 

He also wants to be a beer education resource for the neighborhood. Culturally, Chicago has always been a little behind in the beer scene from other craft beer powerhouse cities, like Denver, Seattle and Portland. Now that Chicago has made strides to catch up to the rest of the country, Turner wants to ensure the south side is as educated as our north side neighbors. 

“This definitely isn’t an industry that you get into to make money. It is my passion for the product and the people that keeps me going after 26+ years,” Turner said. “It has been great to be a part of the growth of the Chicago/Illinois craft beer scenes, and I’m hoping that my passion for what I do will inspire others to get involved.” 

Stay tuned for Open Outcry’s first Irish-style dry stout, to debut just in time for St. Patrick’s Day. “The stout will be traditional, like a Guinness or Murphy’s, and just under 5% abv, so it can be enjoyed all day,” Turner said.  

Say I Love You (Local) for Valentine’s Day

BAPA LOVES our business members and sponsors! We hope our neighbors will also show them some LOVE for Valentine’s Day. Here are a few ways to show some love to several of the businesses that support BAPA and our community.

Say it in the Morning

B-Sides Coffee + Tea

Metropolis coffee, Rishi organic tea and classic love tunes on vinyl.

9907 S. Walden Pkwy. – 773-629-6001

 

Original Pancake House

One apple pancake, two forks. Mmmmm.

10437 S. Western – 773-445-6100

 

Beverly Bakery & Café

Cuddle up and share the Irish breakfast.

10528 S. Western – 773-238-5580

 

Ellie’s Café

Breakfast – simple to sublime – all day.

10701 S. Hale – 773-941-4401

 

Say it With Appetite

Americanos

Delicioso! Authentic Mexican ceviche, taco bar, craft margaritas! Specialty plates for 2 on Valentine’s Day, 5-10pm.

11060 S. Western – 773-771-0743

 

Franconello’s

Spice things up with Italian specialties. Mangia!

10222 S. Western – 773-881-4100

 

Fox’s Beverly PIZZA

The Fox family bought the place from Al Capone’s sister. How’s that for a Valentine’s Day connection?  Guys and dolls can dish up great pizza and lots more.

9956 S. Western – 773-239-3212

 

Top Notch

Burger, fries, shake: Love for generations.

2116 W. 95th St. – 773-445-7218

 

Home Run Inn

Pizza fans love this Chicago signature pie.

10900 S. Western – 773-432-9696

 

Say it With Style

Everything’s Relative

Complete Aveda concept salon services. Love to be pampered!

10548 S. Western – 773-941-6565

 

RMH Design + Boutique

Designer + vintage clothes + accessories.

1802 W. 103rd St. – 773-233-5811

 

Sally Ann Corset Shop

Did we mention unmentionables?

10500 S. Western – 773-298-1031

 

Say it On the Go

County Fair

Find the perfect items for your romantic dinner for two.

10800 S. Western – 773-238-5576

 

Milano’s

Heart shaped pizza delivered to your love nest.

10945 S. Western – 773-445-4010

 

Swanson’s Deli

We love a hot, home cooked dinner!

2414 W. 103rd St. – 773-239-1197

 

Calabria Imports

  1. Step off the train. 2. Stop at Calabria.
  2. Savor with your sweetheart.

1905 W. 103rd St. – 773-396-5800

 

Waldo Cooney’s

Love this: Order online, dinner meets you at the door.

2410 W. 111th St. – 773-233-9781

 

Say it With Flowers

The Blossom Boys

Elegant gifts and florals, plus fun classes!

1810 W. 103rd St. – 773-779-4400

 

Plump Chicago Florals & Events

Do you hear bells ringing? Plump offers wedding planning.

1834 W. 95th St. –  773-614-8225

 

Steuber Florist & Greenhouses

Exquisite florals and plants, and 75 years of local love.

2654 W. 111th St. – 773-238-2013

 

Say it With a Toast

Barney Callaghan’s

Say cheers at a cozy table for two.

10618 S. Western – 773-233-6829

 

Open Outcry Brewing Company

Craft beers, crafty cocktails, yummy menu.

10934 S. Western – 773-629-6055

 

Say It to Music

Beverly Arts Center

Choose from a great schedule of concerts for date night.

2407 W. 111th St. – 773-445-3838

 

Dance Gallery

Get cheek-to-cheek with ballroom dance classes.

10628 S. Western Ave. – 773-445-8910

 

Say it in Good Health

Beverly Yoga Center

Relationship Karma: Take a yoga class together.

1917 W. 103rd St. – 773-239-9642

 

Light House Yoga & Wellness

Recharge: Yoga, Massage, Meditation

11240 S. Western – 773-569-1015

 

Blazin’ Cycle

Take a spin class side-by-side.

10227 S. Western – 708-669-6476

 

Southtown Health Foods

Love is organic! Healthy from head to toe.

2100 W. 95th St. – 773-233-1856

 

Little Company of Mary Hospital

Love is holistic! Resources for health and wellness.

2800 W. 95th St. – www.lcmh.org

 

Say it On Wheels

Mike Haggerty Buick GMC

Nothing says I love you like a new set of car keys!

9301 S. Cicero – 877-879-8868

 

Say it Before You Say Goodnight

Hilton Oak Lawn

Call the babysitter! Book a night away from home.

9333 S. Cicero – 708-425-7800

 

Say it Every Day

SHOP BEVERLY/MORGAN PARK

Support the businesses that support our neighbors! Check our Business Directory for more BAPA members.

 

Goals, Information are Key to Advocating for Better Health Care 

“You’ll never have to go into the hospital unless you break a bone or have another baby!.” This was a promise nurse anesthetist Margaret Fitzpatrick made to her mother Alma. At the time, Alma was 90 years old, and the promise – made by the youngest of the matriarch’s 16 children – put a light spin on a serious subject. Mom did not want to spend the last years of her life at doctor’s appointments or in hospitals, and, as a medical professional, her daughter knows first-hand that health care decisions are not one-size-fits-all.   

In her new book, “Getting the Best Care: Rescuing Your Loved One from the HealthCare Conveyor Belt,” Fitzpatrick provides resources for better understanding treatment options and making informed medical decisions that can help patients and their families navigate the healthcare landscape at all stages of life. In a one-hour presentation Tues., Feb. 26, 10:30 a.m. at Smith Village Community Hall, 2320 W. 113th Pl., Fitzpatrick will share information based on her 20 years of professional experience as well patient stories that can illustrate how caregivers and patients can become better advocates.    

Fitzpatrick grew up in Beverly/Morgan Park and attended Sutherland School. She worked as a critical care nurse at Northwestern Memorial Hospital then Christ Hospital before earning her masters and becoming a nurse anesthetist 10 years ago.  

“Since I got my masters, I’ve seen so much suffering in hospitals,” Fitzpatrick said. It was the experiences of her patients who were older or dealing with multiple medical problems – the people who she said were on the “healthcare conveyor belt” of excessive treatments and prescriptions — that compelled Fitzpatrick to write her book  

“Everybody wants to feel that they are taking care of a person,” Fitzpatrick said. Unfortunately, more is not necessarily better for many older patients, according to Fitzpatrick. Knowing what questions to ask, what kinds of outcomes can you expect from routinely provided treatments and what you need to know before you’re in the throes of a medical emergency can help people make choices that align with their medical wishes.  

In her book, Fitzpatrick provides practical information on topics like setting health care goals, special considerations for advocating for people with dementia, how to maintain autonomy over your health care and how to start the conversation on end-of-life decisions with your family.  

In each chapter, the author uses true stories of patients to illustrate how decisions affect health outcomes. 

Fitzpatrick’s first book, “What to Ask the Doc: The Questions to Ask to Get the Answers You Need,” was released in 2004 and co-authored with two other nurses. The book achieved some success, including a television interview with Katie Couric on the Today Show.  

“Getting the Best Care. Rescuing Your Loved One from the HealthCare Conveyor Belt,” will be released through Amazon this month. Info and excerpts, as well as a chance to win a free copy or purchase the book, are available at gettingthebestcare.com. Advance copies will also be given as door prizes at the Smith Village presentation.  

The Beverly Area Planning Association (BAPA) is partnering with Smith Village to present Fitzpatrick’s talk. Admission is free, but reservations are requested by Fri., Feb. 22 at Smith Village, 773-474-7303Complimentary valet parking will be available. 

 

FLOW Builds Successful Writers

By Kristin Boza

For Love of Writing, or FLOW, is a south side group dedicated to supporting writers on their journey from conceptualizing to publishing — and a lot in-between. The core group of six African American women writers are Tina Jenkins Bell, Lydia Barnes, Chirskira Caillouet, Dr. Janice Tuck Lively, Sandra Jackson Opoku and Bettina Walker. The women started meeting in the mid1990s as a way to workshop their writing projects and support one another in their writing endeavors.  

The support FLOW was so valuable that the core group decided to relaunch in 2012 as FLOW II, allowing associate members to join and participate in the group’s philosophy. “We wanted to recreate that safe, constructive, supportive space for nurturing and completing writing projects and supporting members by participating or hosting launches,” said Jenkins Bell, FLOW president emeritus. “FLOW II added to the original mission, writer’s retreats, professional development workshops and seminars for south side communities, single author salons, networking, and sharing publishing resources and information.” 

Associate members, from new writers to experienced, have an incredible opportunity to learn from accomplished female writers on the south side. The achievements of the core FLOW group are too many to list, but here’s a few highlights: Jenkins Bell is publishing a mini-memoir in 2019 titled “Devil’s Alley” which will appear in the “Love in a Silent Storm” anthology. Walker and Barnes have poems in “Revise the Psalm: Work Celebrating the Writing of Gwendolyn Brooks.” Jackson Opoku wrote “The River Where Blood is Born,” which earned her the American Library Association Black Caucus award. Caillouet is a poet, both on the page and stage and participated in the Gwendolyn Brooks Open Mic Awards. Tuck Lively earned a 2016 Pushcart Award nomination for her short story “Dust Tracks.”  

The FLOW network has provided publishing and funding opportunities for its members. “Because of our individual author salons, at least three of our members have completed novel manuscripts. We’ve met and networked with various publishing professionals,” Jenkins Bell said. “Members of the group are always willing to listen, read, or critique work on an as-needed basis.”  

Aside from personal and professional development, FLOW is determined to make an impact on the community as well. Their writers have partnered with Chicago Public Libraries, Soulful Chicago Book Fair, Bookie’s and the University of Chicago Logan Center for the Arts to offer craft and professional development workshops.  

“People don’t understand that there are many layers to being a writer,” said Barnes, current FLOW president. “The business part of writing, like selling your story, is daunting. We want to help people through that jungle of getting the story out to the world and discovering the various paths to do so.” 

While honing their craft and navigating the business angle of publishing, FLOW writers also have developed strong relationships with one another to create a trust and a sense of security within which they provide feedback.  

“We operate as a family, so we’re very honest and constructive with our critiques,” Jenkins Bell said. “But we won’t lie to you. We want people to gain confidence in what they’re writing.” 

Associate members of any gender or race are welcome to FLOW II. Programming for associate members is varied and will appeal to writers of any level of experience. For more information FlowAuthors.com. 

BAPA Board Member Profile: Craig Huffman

By Grace Kuikman

Craig Huffman, a BAPA Board member since 2016, moved to Beverly/Morgan Park from Hyde Park in 2008. Huffman and his wife, Rebeca, learned about the neighborhood when visiting friends. “I fell in love with the community,” Huffman said, citing the mix of small town feel and big city appeal that has drawn so many people to the Village in the City.

Soon after the Huffmans settled in their East Beverly home they joined BAPA. Supporting your neighborhood organization is, “the right thing to do,” Huffman said. Even though he didn’t know a lot about BAPA’s work when he first came to the community, he has since learned how much BAPA does to preserve and protect our community. When he got the call inviting him to consider serving on the BAPA Board, he said yes,

The expertise Huffman brings to BAPA includes wide experience in board governance and management including not-for-profits, financial analysis, and facilities maintenance – especially helpful as BAPA owns an old building.

A managing partner and co-founder of Ascendance Partners, a commercial real estate investment firm, Huffman brings exceptional insight and experience in this field to BAPA’s board. Ascendance Partners was established in 2006 with a focus on commercial real estate investments that target industrial, retail and office opportunities throughout metropolitan Chicago.

In addition to his commitment to BAPA, Huffman serves on a number of other boards including the Healthy Communities Foundation, a public policy organization that works for prison reform, and an organization that helps ensure that children from low families have access to higher education.

Huffman’s reputation for hard work and deep insights about Chicago communities were certainly factors to him being appointed to the diverse committee of Chicago business and community leaders invited by Mayor Rahm Emanuel to help make the case for moving Amazon HQ2 to Chicago.

In that capacity, Huffman has participated in briefing sessions and opportunities to advocate for Chicago as the best place for Amazon to locate.

Huffman called Amazon a “major player in commerce” citing its enormous span of influence, from affluent communities to poor ones. “Amazon is redefining what many of us know as conventional retail,” he said. Finalists cities should be announced soon, and the selection may be made by the end of this year. Huffman said he’s “hopeful” that Chicago will be selected but adds “We’ve got some tough competition.”  “I think Chicago is the best city in the world, but people in other cities feel the same way,” he said.

Huffman’s experience and perspective gained in his career, in board work and as an active member of the community help shape the programs and goals of BAPA.

“Beverly/Morgan Park is a great community because of the level of the people who are here, and BAPA is a reflection of that,” he said. He encourages neighbors to actively support BAPA. “The more people getting involved in BAPA, the more we’re invested in making sure Beverly/Morgan Park remains a great community.”

The Huffmans have two children, Sofia, 11, a student at St. Barnabas School, and Solomon, 9, a student at Sutherland School.

For more information about supporting BAPA, call BAPA Executive Director Susan Flood, 773-233-3100, or visit www.bapa.org.