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We’re BAPA Members. Are You?

Bookie’s

Bookie’s has brought together the community for 28 years; the last three under the helm of owner Keith Lewis and now at a new location on Western Avenue. “BAPA ties things together in our community,” Lewis said. “BAPA makes it seem like there’s always something happening in the community. From the Cookie Crawl to the Cycling Classic, the community is more vibrant for the activities BAPA puts on.” Lewis believes supporting BAPA as  a business member is essential to continuing to grow the sense of community. “BAPA helps get the names of the businesses out there. They make sure people are thinking about the area,” he said.

Sharon & Gary Jenkins

“We are very proud to be members of the Beverly Area Planning Association. We support this community organization, and feel supported by them. They are in partnership with stores that we patronize. We love the discounts we receive as BAPA members through the use of our BAPA Card. We are also members of the Vanderpoel Improvement Association (VIA), which BAPA supports by copying the flyers and newsletters that are distributed to VIA members. When we attend the monthly CAPS meetings, a member of BAPA is usually in attendance. They realize the importance of knowing what’s going on in the community and the concerns they may be able to help address. BAPA is about partnership and caring for all the residents of Beverly/Morgan Park We will always be members of such a supportive organization. Will you?”

 

Jeff and Michele Pettiford

“Jeff and I are ‘transplants’ to the community. I really love BAPA’s tag line, “come for a visit stay for a lifetime” because that is our family. Jeff and I used to come this way from downtown to visit his grandma. We would drive down Longwood Drive, looking at all of the beautiful houses and Jeff would say, “Pick one.  Any one you want!”  I would laugh – I wanted to pick ALL of them!  My personal favorite BAPA event is Home Tour. I love how people open up their homes to welcome others from all over, share a piece of them, their house history, and why we love to live here. BAPA brings the community together in a modern and family orientated way. That is a community. That is Beverly/Morgan Park.

 

Frank J. Williams

“I moved to Beverly/Morgan Park in 1974. I’ve seen a lot of things in our neighborhood, and, years ago, a lot of it was not so good. But I have also seen a steady improvement in our community’s ability to deal with our diversity on all levels — political, ethnic, economic and educational. This is a community that needs a strong organization like the Beverly Area Planning Association, and needs neighbors who make their diverse opinions known to their association. The beauty of BAPA today is that the folks heading it have the sensitivity to deal with all aspects of our community.”

Marilyn Stone and Linda Lamberty

“Our family has roots on the Ridge that go way back, and we know it has always been a very special place.  The ethnic make-up here has evolved considerably over that time, but what has remained the same is that everyone continues to care so deeply.  They love the place; they support their neighbors; they give of themselves to the community. Even after moving away, this is still HOME and it turns out that you CAN go home again, because while faces may change, the neighborliness here remains the same. BAPA has been a constant here for many years.  It has supported us and helped us navigate the tricky waters of racial change, and it keeps us on our toes as times change in other ways. You see BAPA’s hand everywhere, and in the smiling faces of people who are always working to help us preserve this wonderful place to live. Oh, and we love The Villager!”

Aaron and Leslie Chenoweth

“BAPA creates a true sense of community for the neighborhood. It acts as a convener whether that be its big events like the Ridge Run, its information forums like High School 101 or simply opening up its community room to other local organizations. BAPA is a partner with local businesses, arts organizations and schools.  BAPA makes Beverly/Morgan Park feel like home.  It embodies the motto ‘Love Where You Live.’ We strongly believe in being active members of our community.  For many, this involvement starts with supporting their church or kid’s school.  BAPA should be at the top of that list as well.  Making our community a great place to work, live and play is in all of our best interest.  BAPA’s work takes financial support and volunteer support. It truly takes a village.”

Barney Callaghan’s Pub

Bernard and Mary Callaghan have owned the spot now known as Barney Callaghan’s Pub for over 30 years. Avid supporters of BAPA, the Callaghans appreciate BAPA’s efforts to bring a greater awareness of local businesses to the community. “I love all the new and exciting things BAPA is doing, like the Sip & Shop,” Mary said. “It’s great that they’re trying to creatively drum up business for local businesses.” Mary is looking forward to being a part of this year’s Cookie Crawl. “From the Cycling Classic to the Ridge Run, BAPA does so many great things. Every one of these events bring business our way and new life into the community,” she said.

 

Baird and Sal Campbell

“We feel lucky to live in a beautiful, unique, diverse, thriving neighborhood. If you love where you live, you should support BAPA — it is a simply a smart way to invest in the continued success of our community! BAPA is our community’s biggest cheerleader, celebrating the unique character of our neighborhood and the wonderful people who live here. They help local businesses thrive and connect with the community, which helps both the character and economy of our neighborhood. As a founder of the Beverly Area Arts Alliance, a local non-profit organization, I am extremely grateful for the assistance we’ve received from BAPA over the last four years. They have been there for us many times – often at a moment’s notice. It’s these little things BAPA does every day that have the biggest impact on our community.”

Matt and Ellen King

“My husband Matt and I have lived in the Beverly/Morgan Park area on and off for over 40 years with the exception of a few years on the north side.  We feel strongly about preservation of our neighborhood and keeping an eye on the future Beverly/Morgan Park that we are passing on to our kids. With its forward-thinking leadership and willingness to create events and programs that meet the needs of the people living here, BAPA is an organization that is perfectly aligned with this desire. Becoming a part of BAPA has really opened our eyes to the positive impact that a dynamic neighborhood organization can have throughout the community. For us, supporting BAPA is crucial to feeling like we’re part of the bigger picture. Being BAPA members strengthens our pride in where we live. We’re very grateful that BAPA exists!”

 

Become a BAPA member today! Click here 

 

 

Nurturing Your Body and Spirit

Good health requires a combination of preventative and restorative care. Located at 11240 S. Western, ExcellCare Physical Therapy and Erin Kelly Massage Therapy work in tandem to offer holistic approaches to reducing pain and restoring physical health.

ExcellCare Physical Therapy was established in 1999 with a mission change the way physical therapy is provided in the USA. The facility uses a hands-on approach that focuses pain reduction. “[It is] an absolutely necessary first step in creating a positive patient response,” explained Sanjoy Roy, Director of Physical Therapy. Treatment focuses on a series of purposeful techniques using manual therapy, decompression of the spine, and other forms of holistic ways to treat and cure patients. ExcellCare also integrates acupuncture and next-generation laser therapy to treat pain.

“At ExcellCare, we strongly value the patient experience and believe that the plan of care begins from the moment a patient walks through our doors,” Roy said. Driven by the mission to provide a simple and individualized system of physical therapy care that produces positive results, the staff treats many conditions, including back pain, neck pain, stenosis, arthritis, hip pain and knee pain.

In May, Erin Kelly moved her practice to ExcellCare’s facility. “Erin Kelly’s Massage Therapy practice has been a refreshing addition to the ExcellCare Physical Therapy family.” Roy said. “Our patients have been referred to Erin often for her massage therapy expertise in addition to the physical therapy treatment ExcellCare provides. ExcellCare believes in a strong and meaningful relationship with Erin Kelly to provide optimum patient care.”

Now in her tenth year of practice, Kelly trained at the Chicago School of Massage Therapy, and is a certified and licensed massage therapist specializing in myofascial trigger point therapy to effectively reduce and relieve pain. Caused by injury, repetitive motion and other common factors, myofascial pain is chronic muscle pain that can present along with fatigue, stress, weakness, loss of motion and depression. “It’s not just a sore muscle,” Kelly said.

Kelly combines her education and experience with her natural and intuitive presence and ability to ‘listen’ through therapeutic touch to provide natural healing, helping her clients feel their best. Each patient undergoes a thorough evaluation used to create a personalized treatment plan. Patients are also provided with suggestions for self-care, resources and tips to prevent pain and injury.

Exemplifying her belief and health and spirit are connected, Kelly’s light open space is conducive to healing, and the high grade therapeutic essential oils she uses boost the efficacy of treatment and enhance relaxation. Kelly appreciates working collaboratively with physical therapists to provide an extra layer of pain relief and health benefits to clients.

Kelly, a Beverly/Morgan Park resident, has built her practice here. “I’m grateful to be in a community that’s so supportive,” she said.

ExcellCare Physical Therapy accepts most insurances, and can be reached at 773-779-1111 for appointments. Learn more about the scope of their services at www. ExcellCare.net. Kelly does not do medical billing but accepts referrals. Find more information or make appointments at 773-569-1015 or www.erinkellylmt.com.

Public Art Installation Coming to 99th Street in November

By Kristin Boza

A permanent piece of public art will be unveiled at 99th and Walden Parkway in November. “Quantum Me” is an impressive sculpture fabricated from mirror polished stainless steel (similar to “Cloud Gate” — The Bean — in Millennium Park) and dichroic Plexiglas, and the creation of Chicago artist Davis McCarty. The piece is the 19th Ward’s installation through the City of Chicago’s 50×50 Neighborhood Arts Project.

“Quantum Me” will give viewers an incredible color-changing perspective on themselves and the environment.

“I was inspired by the idea of bending spacetime to jump from one location to another faster than the speed of light,” McCarty said. “If you walk around ‘Quantum Me,’ the colors will magically change before your eyes. Two people standing in different locations can actually see different colors looking at the same spot.”

McCarty explains that this phenomenon is just how sub-atomic particles behave. “We get to witness on a large scale a very amazing part of the universe through this sculpture,” he said.

The idea of teleporting is carried through McCarty’s companion piece, to be installed in Rogers Park. “Because my sculptures are book-ending the city on the north and south, they speak to each other. The idea is that you can stare into one and teleport yourself into the other,” he said. “With ‘Quantum Me,’ people will look up into a giant spherical ball that warps them into the sky. The Rogers Park sculpture is reversed; the ball is on the ground. Viewers will have a similar but different experience.”

McCarty grew up in Southeast Asia where his missionary parents started schools in Thailand and the Philippines. He moved back to the United States to attend school at Beloit College in Wisconsin. “A lot of east Asian temples influence my art. I appreciated the temple that people built that took hundreds of laborers 40-50 years to complete. I love a plain, modern design aesthetic, but I always add extra scroll work and other details to show people the time that it took to create,” he said.

Science and technology are infused within McCarty’s art. “I used to be a lot more of a nerd; I was a computer science major in college, but after doing that for a few years I realized I liked gaming but not coding,” he said. “I had a corporate job for nine years, and made the leap to full-time artist about two months ago. It was one of those things where I got two big commissions and thought ‘if there’s ever a time to do it, now is the time.'”

The sculptures for the 19th Ward and Rogers Park took McCarty about four months to complete and, because of the materials used to create them, they will last for decades.

“They will look as great in 50 years as they do today,” McCarty said. “As a society, we use images to share our experience with others. Creating a sculpture that allows people to photograph themselves in the art while simultaneously capturing the city is a great way to commemorate the experience of visiting Beverly. I hope to make people ask ‘where is that?’ and want to plan their own visit.”

McCarty’s “Quantum Me” was selected for the 19th Ward by a panel of community members, including representatives from BAPA, the Ward office, residents and artists. The project was spearheaded by the Beverly Area Arts Alliance.

Housing News: Honey Do Lists, and Property Tax Info

Put It On the ‘Honey Do’ List

By Chanelle Rogers

Fall is here and winter is on its heels! Sure you’ve got your porch lined with carefully carved pumpkins and someone — I’m not saying who — is lugging cornucopias and fragile, little metallic balls from the basement like he works in the stockroom of a department store. But all that pretty prep will go to pot if you don’t protect your home from the cold weather.

There are three key areas to focus on to ensure a warm winter and cozy holidays:

Don’t let those pipes freeze! Pipes in exterior walls can freeze easily and the worst holiday intrusion is a busted pipe. Talk to a professional plumber about insulating pipes and other ways to prevent freezing or other winter woes.

Keep the warm air in and the cold air out! Save your money for holiday presents not heating bills! Change the filter in your furnace; repair and replace any failing caulk or weather stripping; have the chimney cleaned; and change the direction of your ceiling fans to clockwise.

Fortify the exterior! Free your gutters and downspouts of debris and leaves and trim any trees to save yourself the headache of water damage and leaks. Also, as roofers prepare for their slow season, they’ll have time to come inspect your roof for cracks and repair any damage that could pose a problem over the winter.

The winter prep ‘Honey-Do’ list is long, but adding these few tasks will give you peace of mind as you focus on the bigger things like massive dinners and presents, oh and spending time with family.

 

Don’t Lose Your Property Due to Delinquent Taxes

Every year, hundreds of properties in Cook County are lost by homeowners to so-called “tax scavengers,” who buy houses at auction when the owner fails to pay property taxes. Often, homeowners are caught off guard, having missed their property tax bill in the mail or because they failed to keep up with confusing paperwork.

“Too often, homeowners find themselves in crisis because they didn’t realize their property taxes went unpaid,” said State Sen. Bill Cunningham. “Senior citizens are most susceptible to this problem because their mortgages are more likely to be paid off, so a bank is no longer ensuring the taxes are being paid through an escrow account.”

In Sen. Cunningham’s district alone, 6,211 property owners are past due on their property taxes, according to records maintained by the Cook County Treasurer’s Office.

“If you don’t know your status, please check with the Cook County Treasurer’s Office,” said Cunningham. “This is an easy problem to avoid with a quick phone call or by spending some time on the treasurer’s website.”

The County Treasurer can be reached at 312-443-5100 or at cookcountytreasurer.com.

 

School News

Program Gives Voice to Teens’ Opinions

VOICES Circles (Views, Opinions, Issues, and Concerns Expressed Safely) is one of the many programs at the Catholic Youth Ministry Center at Morgan Park High School, 1825 W. Monterey Ave. The discussion group is open to Center members and is offered on Wednesdays with rotating facilitators including Center staff member John Cook, community resident Linda Cooper and Chicago Police Officer Bill Langle.

“Officer Langle did a few very successful Circles with our students last school year,” said Center Director Peggy Goddard. “The students are happy that he has agreed to lead a session each month this year.”

The Catholic Youth Ministry Center (aka The Blue House) exists to provide guidance for students attending Morgan Park High School. By promoting moral values, the Center reaches out to students, faculty and the community in the roles of advocate, counselor, teacher and friend. Opened in 1979, the Center provides after school drop-in with recreational activities, educational workshops, leadership training programs, community service projects and discussion groups.

On the third Wednesday of the month community resident Laura Lopez will offer a yoga class for the students.

The Center welcomes all students of Morgan Park High School regardless of religious affiliation. For information on membership or programs, call 773-881-0193.

 

Educational Workshops for Students

Own It Chicago is offering two seminars to help students in junior high and high school learn organizational skills, develop better study habits, and strengthen time management and self-advocacy to approach the school year with confidence. Workshops will be held Sun., Oct. 15 at Morgan Park Academy, 2153 W. 111th. The workshop for junior high students is 12 to 2:30 p.m., and the workshop for high school students is 3 to 5:30 p.m.

The Own It team includes a counselor and two teachers with several years of classroom, counseling and coaching experience.  During each workshop, students will evaluate their own learning styles and build an individualized, goal-oriented plan to be successful this school year and beyond.

For information and registration, visit the Own It Chicago website www.ownitchicago.com or email ownitchicago@gmail.com.

 

I Madonnari Joins the Beverly Art Walk

Everyone can be an artist on Sat., Oct. 7. That’s when the Beverly Art Walk will showcase the works of more than 200 talented local artists. And for the first time, Sutherland School is coordinating its popular I Madonnari Italian Street Painting Festival with the larger neighborhood event.

The 15th annual I Madonnari festival invites families and individuals to turn the sidewalks around the school into artistic masterpieces. Numbered sidewalk squares can be “purchased” for $10 apiece, and come with a box of pastel art chalks to decorate your square as you please.

The festival begins at 10 a.m. and ends at 3 p.m., so visitors will have plenty of time to create a painting and enjoy the rest of the Art Walk.

A Sutherland tradition, I Madonnari is a highly anticipated event that draws neighbors from throughout Beverly/Morgan Park. It is a fun filled afternoon that includes food, entertainment, a PTA bake sale, face painting, and more. Pre-ordering squares is encouraged, as they sell out quickly. To reserve a square, email rikkir77@gmail.com.

In case of rain, the event will be moved to Oct. 8, with chalk sales only.

 

Rogers Named National Merit Semifinalist

Mother McAuley High School student and St. John Fisher School graduate Catherine Rogers has been named a National Merit Semifinalist for 2018. She is one of approximately 16,000 semifinalists in the 63rd annual National Merit Scholarship Program. Rogers now has the opportunity to continue in the competition for some 7,500 National Merit Scholarships worth more than $32 million that will be offered next spring.

To be considered for a Merit Scholarship award, semifinalists must fulfill several requirements to advance to the finalist level of the competition.

“Approximately one percent of PSAT testers qualify as National Merit Semifinalists; 16,000 students from a pool of over 1.6 million. When you really think about those statistics it’s hard not to get goosebumps!” said Nikki Carey, director of counseling for Mother McAuley.  “We have always been aware of Catherine’s incredible academic talent, but when put into this larger context it really is nothing short of amazing.”

Last April, Rogers earned the highest possible ACT composite score of 36. On average, less than one-tenth of one percent of students who take the ACT earn a top score.

Rogers is a Catherine McAuley Honors Scholar, a program which recognizes superior academic achievement. Members must maintain at least a 4.09 GPA and complete at least five advanced placement classes before graduation, among other requirements.  She also is a member of the National Honor Society, National English Honor Society, Junior Classical League, Student Ambassadors, Book Club, Math Macs and runs Cross Country and Track.

Rogers was named a Mac with Merit, an award which recognizes students for their honorable character, diligent work ethic and notable contributions to the McAuley community. During her sophomore year, she received with the Irish Fellowship Educational & Cultural Foundation Scholarship.

Hayley Gutrich, a graduate of Christ the King School and McAuley senior, is a National Merit Commended Student. Gutrich is a S​ister Agatha O’Brien Memorial Scholar, which recognizes students who score in the top five percent on the High School Placement Test.  She is involved with the National Honor Society, National English Honor Society​, French Honor Society​, and is a Catherine McAuley Honors Scholar.  She also is a member of a Thespian Society and will participate in McAuley’s fall musical, “Les Miserable.” She sings with the school’s A Cappella Choir and Liturgical Ensemble.​

 

The Neighborhood is the Gallery Beverly Art Walk Day

Start seeing art in unexpected places throughout Beverly/Morgan Park. The 4th annual Beverly Art Walk on Sat., Oct., 7, 12 to 7 p.m., will feature work by more than 200 artists in over 60 alternative exhibition spaces. The Beverly Art Walk is a free family-friendly event. Walk, bike, or park and jump on one of the three free trolleys to experience all the Art Walk has to offer.

Event planners, the Beverly Area Arts Alliance, work with local small business, organizations, and artists to transform the neighborhood into a temporary gallery district. Art is housed in storefronts and restaurants, vacant buildings and outside courtyards, as well as schools and churches.  Not to be missed highlights include an East Beverly yard, which will be transformed into a performance and sound space for artists Cecil McDonald and Brother El; the currently vacant Olivia’s Garden building will be a hub of art from Bridgeport, Blue Island, Pullman, and Cleveland; and the historic Ingersoll-Blackwelder house will return to its artistic roots in displaying work by eight artists, including former owner Jack Simmerling.

Events and activities abound for people of all ages. Trinity Unites Methodist Church, 99th and Winchester, will open its stage for music and performances; at Ridge Historical Society, photographer Mati Maldre will demonstrate how a Deardorff Camera, which uses 4 x 5 sheets of film, is used for architectural photography; and five talented artists in Beverly/Morgan Park, Judie Anderson, Ray Broady, Jomo Cheatham, Pat Egan, and Brian Ritchard open their home studios for an insight on the artistic process, their inspirations, and the work they produce.

Clissold School will host the popular Children’s Park on their front lawn, 110th and Western. Artist Cindy Wirtz and Clissold student and family volunteers will offer a variety of children’s art activities, including kite making, creations from recycled materials, origami peace cranes, and more. Live music, storytelling, a food truck, the Peaceful Playground, a performance by the Pack Drumline, and an interactive public art project will all be featured.

Venues, inside and out, will also be alive with music. More than 30 local music performances will occur throughout the day, including acoustic acts, classical quartets, blues, rap, and rock-n-roll. Chicago’s vibrant music scene will be showcased across the neighborhood and at the Horse Thief Hollow main stage for featured acts. The Beverly Art Walk is also thrilled to host Front Porch Concerts, a pop-up concert series set on front porches throughout Chicago’s diverse neighborhoods. Their goal is to create a unique live music experience while building community and promoting city exploration. FPC will perform in Beverly/Morgan Park—for the first time—at two locations, Brian Ritchard’s and Judie Anderson’s home studios.

For more information about Beverly Art Walk events and activities, view the program book and map online at www.beverlyarts.org. Program books will also be available at each participating venue on October 7th.

The Beverly Art Walk would not be possible without the generous financial support of local small businesses and families, as well as countless volunteer hours by the Alliance board, artists, and neighbors. Support the local arts community: purchase art, shop participating venues, and attend Alliance events. They are driven by a love for art and the people who make it, and are thankful for local businesses and organizations who embrace the arts. The Beverly Area Alliance is a 501c3 not-for-profit organization.

 

AND Hosts 2017 Benefit

A New Direction Beverly Morgan Park (AND), the local domestic violence agency, will host its 2017 fundraiser on Sat., Oct.  21, 7 to 10 p.m. at Ridge Country Club, 10522 S. California Ave.  Live entertainment provided by the Megan Curran Combo, open bar and hors d’oeuvres highlight this annual event, along with a grand raffle and silent auctions.

A highlight of the evening will be the presentation of the ANDi award to The Quilter’s Trunk, 10352 S. Western.  The ANDi award is an annual partnership award given to an individual, business or agency that helps AND fulfill its mission “to provide counseling, education, support and advocacy to individuals and families affected by domestic violence.”

Since opening The Quilter’s Trunk in 2015, owner, Katie Nathwani, and store manager, Lisa Wilberding recognized that giving back to the community is an important facet of their business. They became active participants in Quilting Magazine’s One Million Pillowcases program, which encourages quilt shops around the country to collect handmade pillowcases for donation to charities.

The Quilter’s Trunk expanded the scope of the program by hosting sewing events to create pillowcases, as well as to collect quilts for donation.

The quilts and pillowcases donated to AND are given to women and children served by the agency. Through daily contact with The Quilter’s Trunk customers, word spread about Nathwani and Wilberding’s program and the response has been remarkable. In its first 18 months with the program, The Quilter’s Trunk donated more than 200 pillowcases and 50 quilts.

“Quilters quilt out of love and are very generous with their time,” said Wilberding.

Kristy Arditti of A New Direction, views the program as a way for men and women in the community to connect with and support the agency’s survivors. “Making things by hand is a lost art and we have been witness to the tremendous comfort these quilts and pillowcases have brought our clients.” Arditti said. “The feeling that they are worthy of such beautiful and painstaking creations is not to be undervalued. They also serve as a physical reminder that our clients are not alone and that they deserve safety and comfort.”

Jessica McCarihan, AND Board president agrees. “Our agency depends on community involvement like this to be successful. We are so grateful to The Quilter’s Trunk for supporting our agency in this way.”

The Quilter’s Trunk is the sixth recipient of the ANDi award. Others are The Women of the Castle; Amy Moran, Alphagraphics; Julie Partacz, Standard Bank; Katie and Patrick Murphy, Sweet Freaks; and Jean Catania and the Morgan Park Juniors.

This AND benefit grand raffle first prize is a week vacation at the Playa Grande Resort in Los Cabos, Mexico and an $800 voucher for airfare.  Second prize is two Southwest Airlines round trip tickets anywhere Southwest flies in the continental United States.  Third prize is an Amazon Echo and three Amazon Dots. Featured silent auction items are: jewelry including a beautiful diamond bracelet; sports tickets; tech items, wine and other gourmet items.

AND provides confidential counseling and advocacy services at no charge to clients as they navigate their journey to safety.  AND’s vision is to have every home be safe and free of domestic violence and abuse.  The goal for the 2017 fundraiser is to increase the amount of funds generated through last year’s event in order to continue to grow and provide services to those affected by domestic violence.

AND invites businesses and individuals interested in sponsoring the event or donating items for the silent auctions to contact Monica Carey, monica@anewdirectionbmp.org.  For more information about A New Direction or to purchase tickets visit www.anewdirectionbmp.org.

Neighborhood Notes: News and Events for October 2017

 

Beverly Art Competition Accepting Applications. Artists within 100 miles of the city of Chicago are invited to enter the annual Beverly Arts Center Art Competition and Exhibition, a juried contest that offers prizes that range from $1500 for Best of Show to $100 for honorable mentions. The non-refundable entry fee is $35, and the submission deadline is Oct. 16. Established in 1976 by real estate developer Arthur Rubloff and artists William and Judie Anderson, the contest celebrates the talent of area artists. Finalists and winning works will be exhibited at the Beverly Arts Center, 2407 W. 111th St. The exhibit opening and awards presentation will be held on Nov. 11.  Entry forms are available at the Beverly Arts Center or can be downloaded from the website, www.beverlyartcenter.org.

CAPS Meetings:  CAPS Beat 2221, Tues., Oct. 3, 7 p.m. Christ the King, 9225 S. Hamilton; CAPS Beats 2211 and 2212, Thurs., Oct. 5, 7 p.m. 22nd District Police Station, 1900 W. Monterey; CAPS Court Advocacy Subcommittee, Wed., Oct. 11, 1:30 p.m. 22nd District Police Station; CAPS Beat 2213, Thurs., Oct. 12, 7 p.m. Ridge Park, 9625 S. Longwood Dr.; CAPS Senior Subcommittee, Tues., Oct. 24, 10:30 a.m. 22nd District Police Station; CAPS Domestic Violence Subcommittee, Thurs., Oct. 26, 10:30 a.m., 22nd District Police Station Info: 312-745-0620.

Local School Council Meetings: Vanderpoel Humanities Academy LSC, Tues., Oct. 3, 5:30 p.m., 9510 S. Prospect Ave.;  Kellogg School LSC, Thurs., Oct. 5, 6 p.m., School Library, 9241 S. Leavitt St.,  773-535-2590; Clissold School LSC, Mon., Oct. 16, 7 p.m. , School Auditorium, 2350 W. 110th Pl., 773-535-2560; Sutherland School LSC, Tues., Oct. 17, 6:30 p.m., 10015 S. Leavitt St., 773-535-2580; Barbara Vick Early Childhood & Family Center LSC, Wed., Oct. 18, 3:45 p.m. to 4:45 p.m., Vick Center, 2554 W. 113th St.,  773-535-2671; and Morgan Park High School LSC, Wed., Oct. 18, 7 to 9 p.m. School Library, 1744 W. Pryor, 773-535-2550.

 

Kate Starr Kellogg School, 9241 S. Leavitt, hosts the 16th annual High School Fair Thurs., Oct. 5, 4:30 to 6:30 p.m. in the school gym. Representatives from local public and private high schools will be available for questions from students and families. Open to all. Info: Mrs. Rooney, 773-535-2598 or mirooney@cps.edu.

 

Landscape Guidelines Workshop. Chicago Greystone & Vintage Home Program, Christy Webber Landscapes, and the Chicago Botanic Garden will present a workshop about Chicago landscape guidelines and how they can be applied to enhance the beauty and sustainability of their properties Thurs., Oct. 5, 6:30 to 8 p.m., Chicago High School for Agricultural Sciences, 3857 W. 111th St. Learn the basic principles of landscape design, site considerations such as sun/shade, soil and water, plant selection, and seasonal maintenance. Registration is required by Oct. 4. 773-329-4111 or www.nhschicago.org (click on the “learn how” tab).

Towel Collection for Homeless Shelters. The Beverly Hills Junior Woman’s Club is partnering with Almost Home, a local non-profit, to provide shower kits for homeless guests in emergency shelters by collecting bath/beach towels and washcloths (used is fine) until Oct 14. Donations can be dropped off at BAPA, 1987 W. 111th St., Christ the King Parish, 9235 S. Hamilton Ave., or Bethany Union Church, 1750 W. 103rd St.  A BYOB painting party fundraiser is planned for Fri., Oct. 6, 7 p.m., Bethlehem Lutheran Church, 9401 S Oakley Ave. Tickets are $30 and must be purchased in advance.  Info/tickets: 312-593-1129 or beverlyjuniors@gmail.com.

Teen LGBTQ+ Support Group: A support group that provides an affirming space for gender expansive, transgender, agender, lesbian, gay, queer, bisexual, LGBTQ+ High School aged teens meets monthly at Beverly Therapists, 10725 S. Western, 2nd floor, and also offers social activities. Info: Christina Sprayberry, LCSW, 314-550-4384 or Bonn Wade, LCSW, 773-330-2544.

Electronics and Hazardous Waste Collection. Beverly Unitarian Church will host a collection of household electronics and hazardous waste in the church parking lot, at 103rd and Seeley, Sat., Oct. 7, 8:30 to 11 a.m. The collection is sponsored by the church’s Green Sanctuary Group and Beverly Bank, and donations are encouraged to help defray costs. Accepted electronics include computers, monitors, printers, small electronics, TV under 35 inches, cell phones and pagers. Hazardous items must be properly sealed and include mercury fluorescent bulbs, anti-freeze, used motor oil, oil based paints, batteries, lawn chemicals, pool chemicals and solvents. Find complete list of what will be accepted at www.beverlyunitarian.org/green-sanctuary-group

Garage Sale Benefits Maple/Morgan Park Food Pantry. Morgan Park Junior Woman’s Club will host its annual Garage Sale benefit to support the Maple/Morgan Park Food Pantry Sat., Oct. 7, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., Bethany Union Church, 1750 W. 103rd St. The indoor venue allows shoppers to support the Food Pantry come rain or shine. This event has raised thousands of dollars to assist our neighbors in need.  With the holidays approaching, the Food Pantry is being used more and more and needs your help. Support this cause and get some bargains.

22nd District Dog Walk. The 22nd District Police Domestic Violence Subcommittee hosts the 8th annual Dog Walk Sat., Oct. 7 9:30 a.m. at the police station, 1900 W. Monterey Ave. The event raises awareness about domestic violence and its link to animal abuse. You don’t need to bring a dog to attend. In addition to the walk, participants will enjoy a blessing of the dogs, raffles, giveaways and light refreshments. Info: 312-745-0620.

Community Blood Drive. Community Blood Drive. The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, 11107 S. Vincennes, hosts an interdenominational community blood drive with the American Red Cross, Thurs., Oct. 12, 2 to 7 p.m. About 38,000 people need blood each day in the United States, and each pint of donated blood may help as many as three people. To minimize wait times, call 1-800- 733-2767 for an appointment. On the day of the drive, pre-register at www.redcrossblood.org/RapidPass.

Wellness Seminar. Beverly Therapists, 10725 S. Western, 2nd floor, wellness seminars on the second Saturday of each month, September through May.  On Sat., Oct, 14, 3 to 5 p.m., “Beyond the Power Struggle: Supporting Teens,” offers insight into adolescent development, attachment and positive youth development theories. This interactional workshop offers parents a deeper dive around the competing needs that confront many adolescents and explores the developmental, neurodevelopmental, and social factors that impact a young person’s ability as they transition successfully to adulthood. Learn techniques to communicate and intervene with your teenager within a supportive group setting. $10. Register at www.BeverlyTherapists.com.

October at Beverly Arts Center. There’s a lot of fun in store this month at the Beverly Art Center, 2407 W. 111th St.: An Evening with M&R Rush, Sat., Oct. 14, 8 p.m., $15; Get Spooky family fun, Sun., Oct. 22, 2 to 4 p.m., free; and Michael McDermott’s Halloweensteen, Sat., Oct. 28, 8 p.m., $30. BAC get member discounts on tickets. Info: 773-445-3838, www.beverlyartcenter.org.

Mercy Circle Tour. Meet Marge Everett, Senior Living Advisor and other key staff members at Mercy Circle, 3659 W. 99th St., during an open house, Sun., Oct. 15, 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Visitors can tour the continuing care retirement community and learn about services and amenities. Mercy Circle provides a continuum of care ranging from independent living, through assisted living and into skilled nursing care.   Assisted living residents have access to physical, occupational and speech therapy services as prescribed by their physicians, as well as comprehensive help with medications, bathing and other physical needs.

Finding Holiday Joy When Grieving. Finding Holiday Joy When Grieving, a seminar exploring ways for people who are grieving the loss of a loved one to get through one of the toughest times of the year, will be held Sat., Oct. 21, 3 to 5:30 p.m., Beverly Therapists, 10725 S. Western., 2nd floor. The session includes a DVD presentation, discussion, sharing, strategies for resilience, and a chance to create memory boxes to take home (bring a photo of your loved). Info/registration: www.BeverlyTherapists.com.

“Conspiracy” Film Showing.  at Morgan Park United Methodist Church. In light of the current political and cultural climate of hate in our country, Morgan Park United Methodist Church,11030 S. Longwood Dr., is hosting opportunities to bring our community together for a conversation about the issue. On Fri., Oct. 20, 6 p.m., the church will show the film “Conspiracy”, which depicts a meeting held in January 1942 by the Nazi leadership to elicit support for a plan to exterminate the Jews. The community is invited to the viewing, conversation and personal story sharing aimed at creating ethnic and racial understanding and compassion.The event is co-sponsored by Unity and Diversity and 19th Ward Ald. Matt O’Shea. Info: 773-238-2600.

Beverly Theatre Guild Presents ‘Avenue Q.’ The Beverly Theatre Guild presents its fall musical, “Avenue Q,” on the weekends of Oct. 20 to 22 and Oct. 27 to 29 at the Morgan Park Academy Arts Center, 2153 W. 111th St. Staged like a children’s show, “Avenue Q” is a satire about a recent Princeton graduate who moves to a shabby New York apartment and struggles to find a job and meaning in life. The show carries a parental advisory. Tickets are $21 and available online at www.beverlytheatreguild.org, or by calling 773-BTG-TIXS.

League of Women Voters Meeting.  The League of Women Voters of Chicago-Far Southwest Side Group will meet Wed., Oct. 25, 7 p.m., Beverly Unitarian Church, 10244 S. Longwood Dr., to discuss Tax-Increment Financing. The League is a non-partisan organization that provides informal discussion of current political, social and economic issues. Public welcome. Info: 312-939-5949, 773-233-1420 or lwvchicago.org.

Day of the Dead Lecture and Workshop. In a workshop that includes a lecture on Day of the Dead (Dia de Muertos) traditions and Alebrije folk art, Carlos Orozco, an indigenous artist from Oaxaca, Mexico, will present examples of traditional folk art then provide workshop participants with wooden skull cutouts to paint in the traditional Alebrije style, Wed., Nov. 1, 6 to 8 p.m., Beverly Branch Library, 1962 W. 95th St. Registration required: 312-747-9673.

New Venues, New Vendors for HollyDays. HollyDays, the popular shopping/socializing event that supports the I Am Who I Am Foundation will be held Sat., Nov. 4, 6 to 10 p.m., at two new venues: Cork & Kerry, 10614 S. Western, and Barney Callaghan’s Pub, 10618 S. Western. The event features 20 new artists and vendors, and a community of teens and adults with special abilities showcasing the new line of I Am bath and body products. Donations are welcome at the door. HollyDays provides funding for awareness and programs benefiting families with members who have special needs.

Home Cooking: Swanson’s Deli

By Kristin Boza

Swanson’s Deli and Catering, 2414 W. 103rd St., has been a neighborhood staple for over 50 years. Under new ownership since December, Swanson’s continues to offer Swedish specialties and American fare, and it is important for new owners Todd Thielmann and Greg Dix to continue the neighborhood tradition.

“Swanson’s was historically a Swedish deli, and we continue to offer Swedish items like Limpa bread, Gottenburg sausage, Bondost cheese and potato sausage,” said Thielmann. “The Swedish offerings are expanded during Christmas.”

Thielmann said that customers expect their delectable best sellers, including potato salad, chicken salad and the ever-popular cheeseballs. “My idea of a perfect sandwich is chicken salad on a buttercrust roll with lettuce, tomato and red onion,” Thielmann said. “Throw in a side of potato salad and it’s heaven.”

Dix and Thielmann grew up in Beverly/Morgan Park and felt it was essential to continue the Swanson’s role within the community.

“Whether it’s news at the different parishes, talk about local sports teams or the goings-on around town, it feels like Swanson’s is in the middle of it all,” Thielmann said. “Customers always thank us for taking over and continuing the legacy. It’s sad when a long-time business closes their doors, and we are excited about breathing new life into a community cornerstone.”

Fresh, high-quality food is essential to the pair as they retain the community favorites and enhance their menu.

“Greg and I look at it like we are now the caretakers of a loved and established deli. Customers have high expectations of the quality and consistency of the food we offer,” Thielmann said. For example, the chicken used in the chicken salad is cooked in-house and cut by hand, and the potatoes are peeled and diced by Dix and Thielmann.

“Our customers are very loyal because they know that we work very hard to present the best product,” Thielmann said.

Try to capture the best of Swanson’s flavors at home by making your own version of their chicken noodle soup. Or if all else fails, stop in for a cup to enjoy at home.

Chicken Noodle Soup
Makes approximately 3 quarts

Ingredients:

2 quarts chicken stock

1 1/2 cups carrots, diced

1 1/2 cups yellow onion, diced

1 cup celery, diced

1 Tbsp. garlic, chopped

2 cups cooked chicken, diced

2 cups egg noodles

1 Tbsp. parsley, chopped

Salt & pepper, to taste

2 Tbsp. cornstarch

1/4 cup water or chicken stock, cold

Bring chicken stock to a boil and immediately turn down heat to a simmer. Add vegetables and garlic. Simmer until vegetables are soft (about 7 to 10 minutes) add noodles and simmer another 5 to 7 minutes. When noodles are cooked, add chicken, parsley and salt and pepper to taste. Remember to never let soup reach a boil. Adjust seasoning, if needed, and serve hot with crackers or crusty bread.

Shop at Swanson’s Mon. through Fri., 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., and 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sat. Order ahead by calling 773-239-1197. More info: www.swansonsbeverlydeli.com.

The Way I See It: Importance of Neighborhood Schools

By Meg Burns, Principal, Sutherland Elementary

As a Beverly/Morgan Park resident for 25 years, I have a profound commitment to the success of my local public school. We are privileged in this neighborhood to have outstanding educational choices. One of those choices has always been Sutherland Elementary.

I have been privileged to have many conversations with parents and community members about the future growth of Sutherland. There is so much this wonderful school has to offer, and I’m proud to have been given the opportunity to enlist the trust of the community who for years has revered and respected the Sutherland name.

Despite recent challenges, Sutherland has always had a core of unwavering community support and dedicated parents, talented teachers and staff who have worked hard to keep the school moving forward.  The goal of any neighborhood school is to be filled with children from the community it serves. As the new principal of Sutherland, my pledge is to make Sutherland a viable and desirable choice for Sutherland neighborhood families.

Sutherland is where my own children attended and thrived. As a Sutherland parent, it’s where I was inspired to begin a career in education. My continuing goal will be to ensure that Sutherland is a place where local children can receive an outstanding education, connect with neighborhood families and grow to become strong members of our community.