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95th Street Fall Fest Offers Family Fun

Pumpkin Spice and everything nice! Celebrate the new season at the 95th Street Fall Fest, Sat. Oct. 6, 12 to 3 p.m., Barraco’s Beverly parking lot, 2105 W. 95th St. From face painting for the kids to TVs tuned to college football games for the dads, it’s a guaranteed good time for the whole family. 

The event provides a platform for 95th Street businesses to promote themselves to area shoppers. Many of the stores are participating in or sponsoring the fest. 

Erin Ross, Executive Director of the 95th Street Business Association, said the fest is the perfect opportunity for residents to discover all that the 95th Street businesses have to offer. “Our businesses are excited to showcase their goods and services,” Ross said. “Residents can travel down 95th Street and explore our many shops.” The business community looks forward to welcoming area residents for an afternoon of celebration, she added. 

Don’t miss enjoying the Fall Fest pictures colored by local third grade students that will be displayed in many of the store windows. Students from Kellogg, Christ the King, St. Barnabas, Sutherland and Vanderpoel elementary schools were invited to participate in a coloring contest sponsored by the Beverly Area Planning Association (BAPA). Check out the art while browsing at your favorite shops.  

The Fall Fest offers a wide itinerary of activities: Live music by Bridget Cavanaugh and Garrett Degnan, arts & crafts and cookie decorating for kids, and a live animal show. Food and beverages will be available for purchase. Football fanatic? Televisions inside the bar area will be tuned to live college games. 

This event is sponsored by 19th Ward Ald. Matt O’Shea, Sen. Bill Cunningham, Rep. Fran Hurley, Barraco’s, Beverly Area Planning Association, 95th Street Business Association, Christ the King Parish, 22nd District Police, Beverly Improvement Association, Beverly Ridge Homeowners Association and Smith Village. 

Village Viewpoint

By Susan Flood, BAPA Executive Director 

It’s August and once again, I’m helping my kids move.  This got me thinking.  What makes a place home?  What makes Beverly/Morgan Park feel like home even if you’ve moved away? What do you love about Beverly/Morgan Park?  BAPA wants to know.  It’s BAPA’s job to know.  We challenge ourselves to always be asking, watching, and listening so we are able connect people with the same passions to act collectively.  

BAPA has a history of providing services and responding to problems. That’s an important resource for any community.  But what if instead of providing the answers, we focused on the questions? What are the gifts and assets that make our community so distinctive? Some things we’ve noticed: 

We have residents who are connected 

Recently, the Beverly Hills Cycling Classic brought an outpouring of rain but more remarkably it also brought out and outpouring of support from over 2000 people who came out to the event and over 130 volunteers who helped and over 30 community partners who stood alongside BAPA and the cyclists. How remarkable it was that people were more driven to be together than they were to be dry and comfortable.   

We have history 

We celebrate our community’s history by maintaining the homes and buildings that make it so distinctive, so that we reveal the story about what our community was, how it became what it is today, and in turn can help us and our children understand who we are.   

We have diversity 

The diversity of our community is outstanding. In an age where diversity and race can be a touchy subject, it is comforting to see different cultures on virtually every block and refreshing that not everybody looks the same. 

We give back 

Our neighborhood helps families in times of trouble. We support a large number of non-profits, entrepreneurs and small businesses. We stand behind each other through the ups and downs. 

We care about Art 

Through our support of the Beverly Arts Center, the Vanderpoel Art Museum and the Beverly Area Arts Alliance to the many artists who call Beverly Home we have so much to offer.  Our own Gary and Denise Gardner are the force behind the amazing Charles White Retrospective on display at the Art Institute.   

We have Rainbow Cone 

Seriously, right? 

So tell us, what do YOU love about Beverly Morgan Park?  All answers are important to BAPA.  Join the conversation by emailing me at sflood@bapa.org.  You never know, you might connect for action you never thought possible.   

Village Viewpoint

By Susan Flood, BAPA Executive Director 

Like any good Chicagoan I am absolutely thrilled when summertime rolls around.  I often find myself wondering if those who live in warm climates ever experience the day after day euphoria we feel when we open our front doors on summer days.      

At BAPA, summer comes with some kind of event to produce almost weekly: Home Tour, Ridge Run and Memorial Day Parade, weekly Family Fun Nights and Tech Tuesdays. Coming up next is the Beverly Hills Cycling Classic.   

While these events keep the BAPA staff on our toes for a few months, they are not possible without the time, energy and commitment of our neighborhood partners. The process is a lot like leading an orchestra for a performance piece with BAPA as the conductor.  The music happens when everybody comes together with their talent and hard work, sitting alongside friends and neighbors, pursuing the common goal of offering sheer enjoyment to all who come out to join us.   

Our local restaurants come out of their kitchens to offer their best in picnic style foods, beverages and treats.  The Alderman’s staff and the police from our 22nd District help in too many ways to count.  The Ridge Run wouldn’t be possible without Chicago Park District’s Ridge Park and the big-hearted hard-working Park District staff.   

We showcase our neighbors who have talent (and there are so many) to entertain us with music, art or children’s activities.  Our local businesses sponsor the events so we can afford to put them on, and join us onsite to meet residents and talk about what they have to offer.   

This year our 16th Beverly Hills Cycling Classic and Bikes and Brews Festival will be possible thanks to St. Barnabas parish joining us as a new festival partner following the closing last year of Beacon Therapeutic School.  The new St. Barnabas location makes the event more exciting than ever, with a challenging new race course and sprawling festival grounds in the St. Barnabas parking lot. I can practically hear the music now!   

And of course, all of you are important partners. 

Neighbors jump in to volunteer for tasks like selling tickets, pouring drinks, serving as course marshals or helping set up tables or tents.   

Watching everyone coming together takes us all to a new height of connection.  Like individual instruments, we can all make music as a solo, but when we’re all working together the result is an experience that transforms the day.  As a team, we create memories, make new friends and accomplish something wonderful. And it’s all in our own backyard.   

I can tell you, from where BAPA stands as conductor, our community orchestra is nothing short of extraordinary.  

The LAB Designs Nutrition and Fitness with Busy Moms in Mind

By Kristin Boza 

Live and Believe is a fresh nutrition and fitness concept that opened last month on 95th St. The LAB Nutrition, 2025 W. 95th St., and The LAB Fitness, a couple doors down at 2019 W. 95th St., offer “Smoothies with Soul” and flexible fitness classes. The family-owned business is determined to make it easy for busy women to take care of their overall health and well-being. 

Owned by Morgan Martin and her father, Mike Martin, the family’s mission is to help people transform mentally, physically and spiritually while helping them live a life they love. “We want people to believe that anything they see for themselves is possible. We want to bring a healthy and positive environment to the Beverly area,” Morgan Martin said.  

At The LAB Fitness, participants engage in a comprehensive fitness, nutrition and spiritual plan. “Through workouts, nutrition and a private online community, [our clients] will focus on wellness of the mind, body, and soul,” she said. “Portions of our class fees go to the Marcus Martin Foundation where we give college scholarships, free youth football camps and fitness for the community.” 

The LAB Nutrition will assist the fitness aspect of the company by encouraging customers to choose healthy foods. “We specialize in serving smoothies with soul; we want to provide healthy alternatives, like protein snacks, energy teas, good vibes, good music and, of course, our soul smoothies,” she said.  

The smoothies have fun names, like Blueberry Muffin or Apple Pie, but they’re actually really healthy. “All of our smoothies are under 220 calories with about 20 grams of protein and 24 vitamins, minerals, and other nutrients,” Martin said. “The smoothies are intended to be a meal replacement, not used as a typical protein drink after a workout.”  

LAB Nutrition also offers energy teas; the Beverly Brew is one of the most popular options and includes a B12 energy shot to help boost metabolism. “We sell a lot of tea during the day, all of which we make fresh onsite. The energy teas are a great pick-me-up to get through the day,” Martin said. 

“So many people often don’t have time to work out. Working in this area with so many moms who work 9 to 5, time is difficult to find. I’ve found that if you can improve your nutrition, working out five days a week isn’t necessary,” Martin said. “We wanted to bring in an accessible fitness program that fits into busy lifestyles.” 

The LAB Nutrition is open Mon. through Thurs., 6 a.m. to 8 p.m.; Fri., 6 a.m. to 6 p.m., and Sat., 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., and they are closed on Sundays. The LAB Fitness schedule runs Mon. through Thurs., and three Saturdays a month.  

BreakFit Circuit Training is at 5 a.m. on Mondays and Wednesdays; Cardio Drumming is offered on Mondays at 5:30 p.m. and 7:30 p.m.; HITT The Floor is on Tuesdays at 5:30 p.m. or 7:30 p.m.; Candlelight Yoga is offered on Wednesdays at 6:30 p.m.; Dance Cardio takes place on Thursdays at 5:30 p.m. and 7:30 p.m.; and finally, Circuit Training is Saturdays at 9 a.m. First time attendees pay a drop-in fee of $5; otherwise, the classes are $10 for drop-in, or purchased in a monthly package. 

Beginning on Jul. 15, The LAB Fitness offers a 90-day transformation program complete with online workouts, a grocery list, access to a private online page, mindset activities and a professional photo shoot and celebration after completion. To find out more, visit Facebook.com/LiveAndBelieveWellness. 

Taxpayer Advocates Help Homeowners Save on Property Taxes

As the City of Chicago is rolling out its triennial reassessment this year, local property tax appeal firm Taxpayer Advocate Group (“TAG”), is celebrating its 10 year anniversary of helping Cook County homeowners pay the lowest possible tax bill.   

Born out of the financial crisis, TAG was founded at a quaint Irish pub by mortgage bankers Jason Terrell, TAG’s president and Certified Illinois Assessing Officer, and his West Point grad co-founder. As self-funded entrepreneurs, “It’s been fun to experience our progression,” Terrell said. “When we started the company we were using static files and excel spreadsheets; now it’s all cloud computing technology allowing us to identify saving opportunities instantaneously.”  

Xpress Tax Appeals is innovative software that TAG developed to challenge the County’s assessment of a residential property and to streamline the Cook County tax appeal process. Terrell explained that the County taxes your property by first assessing its value.  That base value, along with the state equalizer and tax rate, is used to calculate property taxes.  Due to the large volume of real estate parcels in Cook County, the Assessor’s Office calculates a property’s assessed value by using a mass appraisal method.   

“This model often allows for unequal treatment of property.” Terrell said. “TAG appeals your taxes by identifying the County’s inequitable assessment of your property and then by filing a property tax appeal.  By filing an appeal, a homeowner is requesting a more just and fair assessed value. Lowering the assessed value means homeowners will effectively save on their property taxes.” 

On July 27, Beverly/Morgan Park residents and other Lake Township homeowners are expected to receive their reassessment notices. 

“Unfortunately, if these reassessments are like the 2018 North Side reassessments that have already been sent to property owners in Lakeview and Rogers Park, you can expect to see a large hike in your assessment. Some properties have seen increases up to 40%,” Terrell said.  July 27 marks the beginning of a 30-day window in which residents of Lake Township will be able to file an appeal. 

The strongest argument a homeowner can make in the appeal process is “lack of uniformity” – an argument that the property is being over-assessed as compared to properties with similar characteristics (i.e. neighborhood, construction type, age, etc.).   

Although it’s most advantageous to appeal in the reassessment year, homeowners have the right to appeal their property taxes every year, as newly sold comparable properties or other changes in a neighborhood could provide another opportunity for a successful reduction.    

The tax appeal process is complex and fraught with paperwork and deadlines. TAG is committed to giving homeowners peace of mind by meeting the challenges posed by the County and by ensuring that assessed values remain as low as possible.  In addition, there are no upfront fees for the service and there is no charge if the appeal is unsuccessful. 

TAG is no stranger to the Beverly/Morgan Park area. Operations manager Justin Sipich grew up playing baseball at Kennedy Park and lived on 107th Street where his family still resides. Sipich, along with TAG property tax analyst, Alex Coston, graduated from Morgan Park Academy. Because of their affinity for the community and its residents, TAG is a BAPA business member and a sponsor of BAPA’s 16th annual Bikes & Brews Cycling Classic on July 20.   

TAG looks forward to helping community residents achieve the lowest possible property tax.  Visit www.XpressTaxAppeals.com/BAPA by Aug. 31, 2018 for a 20% discount on their services. 

Music, Art, Food and Brews at Summer Swelter #5

Embrace the dog days of summer at Horse Thief Hollow’s 5th annual summer party, Sat., July 21, noon to 10 p.m., 10426 S. Western Ave. A day of live music, art and dance promises fun while benefitting a great cause — the proceeds from this year’s event will benefit the Beverly Area Arts Alliance, which seeks to identify opportunities and incubate ideas to advance Beverly/Morgan Park as a hub of culture and creativity.  

“It’s the fifth anniversary of the art alliance and our business,” said Lizzy Benner, Horse Thief Hollow Manager. “We thought this would be a great opportunity to give back to all they do for this community.” 

The local brewery and restaurant currently partners with the Beverly Arts Alliance to feature Local Art on Tap, an exhibit of paintings, sculpture, and other works by area artists that is updated quarterly. The exhibit, Rollicking Rampage, will feature works by Matthew Coglianese, Kevin Demski, Ben Schlitz, Christine Connor, Jeannie Higgins and Kristen Dobbins. Be sure to check it out!   

A Kiddies Swelter will take place from noon to 3 p.m. This will feature crafts and a group project that will be unveiled at the Beverly Art Walk this fall by Ellen King of Mrs. King’s Art Camp; face painting by Cathy Sorich of Marvelous Faces; and children’s music. An artisan craft fair will take place from 12 to 4 p.m., and artist Ben Schlitz will produce a chainsaw sculpture during the event that will be auctioned off at a later date with proceeds benefiting the Alliance.  

Live music will begin at 5:30 p.m. with The Pack Drumline and Dance Crew, which will be followed by a performance by H.a.R.D, featuring Jasmine Gill from 7 to 10 p.m. Molloy and Associates, local real estate agency, is sponsoring the party’s music scene, and artist Brendan Mack will be doing a live painting performance to the groves of H.a.R.D 

And of course, food and brews from Horse Thief Hollow will be served to hungry and thirsty partygoers. Because would it even be a party without them? 

Special Recreation in Mount Greenwood Gives Back

By Kristin Boza

With the upcoming 50th anniversary of the Special Olympics is this July, the participants in the Special Recreation program at Mount Greenwood Park are gearing up for the competition while maintaining their mission of giving back to the community. 

The program serves children and adults with intellectual disabilities in the Chicagoland area, and currently has 115 participants ranging in age from 7 to 65, according to Special Recreation Coordinator Lisa Mulcrone. Mulcrone has been a part of the program in some capacity for the last 27 years, beginning as a volunteer when her sister, Sioban, was enrolled in the Special Recreation program. 

While the program accepts community volunteers to help out, the participants in the Special Recreation program have become great partners to other community groups as well. 

“We have volunteered by baking cookies at the Oak Lawn Ronald McDonald House, we assist BAPA with the Ridge Run and Home Tour, and we volunteer with Special Children’s charities in various jobs, such as assisting with 5K runs, the annual Duck Derby fundraiser, and the Polar Plunge, to name a few,” Mulcrone said.  

The Special Recreation group has been essential in helping BAPA with the Ridge Run by stuffing goody bags, handing out fliers along the race route, and passing out refreshments and finishing medals to the Ridge Run runners. 

Mulcrone and the team is especially looking forward to participating in the Special Olympics July 17 through 21 at Illinois State University in Bloomington, Ill. Athletes will compete in power lifting, track and field, gymnastics, swimming and bocce, according to Mulcrone.  

“We are extremely excited about being a part of the 50th Anniversary of the Special Olympics. We will be attending as a group, hoping to make it to the majority of activities that Special Olympics has planned,” Mulcrone said. “We compete year-round in 14 different Special Olympic sports.” 

To get involved as a volunteer with the Special Recreation program in Mount Greenwood, contact Lisa Mulcrone, lisa.mulcrone@chicagoparkdistrict.com. To volunteer at a Special Olympics event, contact Eileen Guinane, eileen.guinane@chicagoparkdistrict.com. 

 

Neighborhood Notes

95th Street Farmers Market. The 95th Street Farmer’s Market, located in the commuter parking lot at 95th and Longwood Dr., is open every Sunday through Oct. 28 from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m., rain or shine. Visit with local organizations in the community tent, keep the kids busy with facepainting and other activities, enjoy live music and shop for fresh produce and a variety of other items. New and old vendors offer a wide variety of farm fresh fruits, veggies, herbs and flowers; organic foods; cheese; bread; sweet treats; prepared foods and more. The market is organized by the 95th Street Business Association.  

Support Group for Caregivers. Smith Village, 2320 W. 113th Pl.,invites local residents to a free support group for people who take care of people who suffer from Alzheimer’s disease or dementia, Tues., July 3, 6:30 p.m. The group will be hosted by Diane Morgan, social service director of long-term care, who will lead an open discussion on topics that can range from “sundowning” to the disease’s progress to what certain behaviors mean. Reservations: 773-474-7300 or familyandfriends@smithvillage.org. 

Country on Western. Barney Callaghan’s Pub, 10618 S. Western, hosts the Country on Western Music Festival Sat., July 7, beginning at 3 p.m. Eight country music acts will perform in the parking lot and local food vendors that be serving include Americano’s and  Soggy Butts Barbecue.  

CAPS Meetings. Area residents are encouraged to get involved in CAPS meetings. For information, call the 22nd District CAPS office, 312-745-0620 or stop by the 22nd District Police Station, 1900 W. Monterey. Court Advocacy Subcommittee, Wed., Jul. 11, 1:30 p.m. 22nd District Police Station; Beat 2213, Thurs., Jul. 12, 6:30 p.m. Ridge Park, 9625 S. Longwood Dr.; Domestic Violence Subcommittee, Thurs., Jul. 26, 10:30 a.m. 22nd District Police Station. 

St. Walter Arts & Crafts Fair. St. Walter Catholic School presents the Arts & Crafts Fun Fest, Sat., July 14, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., at the school, 11741 S. Western. Enjoy a day of shopping for unique items including jewelry, photos, painting candles and more, as well as family activities. Vendor application fee is $55. Info/applications: www.stwalterparish.com 

LSC Meeting. Morgan Park High School LSC, Wed., Jul. 18, 7 to 9 p.m. MPHS Library, 1744 W. Pryor. 773-535-2550. 

Big City Basketball Camp. The Church of Chicago will host the Big City Basketball Camp (BCBC) weekdays, Mon., July 9 through Fri., July 20, 6:30 to 8:30 p.m., Vanderpoel School, 9510 S. Prospect Ave. The camp is open to boys and girls in 3rd through 8th grades. BCBC was created to build communities through sports participation and character building. Participants will have fun and develop sportsmanship and teamwork as they engage in skills training, contests, life lessons and healthy competition. Every camper receives an equal opportunity to play and learn. The camp is led by volunteers who provide a positive and supportive atmosphere. Each camper receives a basketball camp T-shirt, basketball and awards poster. For more information call 773-672-7230 or visit www.churchofchicago.org/bcbc.    

Jazz-n Q Concert. Jazz-n Q featuring music by the MoPa Quartet (musicians are members of the nationally recognized Lowdown Brass Band) and barbecue, will be held Sun., July 22, 4 p.m., Morgan Park Presbyterian Church, 2017 W. 110th Pl. Free to all. Info: www.morganparkpres.org.     

Vacation Bible School. Morgan Park Presbyterian Church and Morgan Park United Methodist Church will be teaming up for one week of Vacation Bible School: “Here, There and Everywhere: Finding God’s Love with Dr. Seuss,”  July 23 through 27 with a closing picnic on Sun., July 29. The activities will be held at Morgan Park Presbyterian Church, 2017 W. 110th Pl. Info: www.morganparkpres.org.     

Community Blood Drive. The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, 11107 S. Vincennes, will host a community blood drive with the American Red Cross Thurs., July 26, 1 to 6 p.m. Community members are encouraged to donate blood and help ensure that patients in local hospitals have an ample supply of blood. To minimize wait times, schedule an appointment at 1-800-RED CROSS (1-800-733-2767).  On the day of the drive, people can pre-register at www.redcrossblood.org/RapidPass. 

The Frunchroom, Volume XIV.The Beverly Area Arts Alliance presents The Frunchroom, a quarterly event about the South Side will be held Thurs., July 26, 7:30 p.m., Beverly Arts Center, 2407 W. 111th St. Hosted and produced by neighborhood resident Scott, readers, writers, artists and performers share their stories in the same way your friends and family sat around in their own frunchr…er, front rooms and did the same. Stories might be fiction, non-fiction, funny, emotional, personal, reported or somewhere in-between. Info: thefrunchroom.com.  

Terrain Fest + Slow Roll Chicago Ride. Presented by the Southwest Chicago Diversity Collaborative, the Beverly Area Arts Alliance and Slow Roll Chicago, Terrain Fest will take place Sat., July 28, 2 to 6 p.m., as the business district at 99th to 100th Streets on Walden Parkway and Wood Street is transformed into a walkable street plaza where residents can lounge, kids can ride bikes and all can witness the diversity of our community. Terrain Fest celebrates making our community more walkable, bike-able and diverse. Plus, back by popular demand is Slow Roll Chicago, a leisurely bike ride through Beverly and the South Side. The event features food trucks, beverages, art, music and a kids’ area as well as information stations on how you can help make our neighborhood less auto-dependent.  

Mercy Circle Summer Open. When visitors to the open house at Mercy Circle, 3659 W.99th St., Sun., July 29, 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., they tour the main floor dining room, bistro, exercise room, boutique salon, library as well as the awe-inspiring Chapel where Mass is offered six days a week. They can also visit the gardens and courtyard. Senior Living Advisor Marge Everett and other staff members will conduct tours, answer questions and explain the many services and continuum of care available at the CCRC.  “At Mercy Circle we offer top quality healthcare and support services,” Everett said, “but we believe it is the heart and soul of our mission to provide the perfect blend of independence and engagement for each individual according to his or her needs and desires.”  Info/private appointments: 773-253-3600. 

Local Mountain Biker a Champion

By Abby Johnson 

Jim Pittacora is not the kind of person to fill his fireplace mantle with medals. He doesn’t want anyone to know that he has more than 100 of them for mountain biking. And even talking about the shiny prizes makes him anxious; he waves his hand in the air as if to say that particular piece of information isn’t important. 

But there is no hiding that Pittacora is a champion.  

He has won four state titles since his first big race in 2012 and twice finished first place in the Breck 100, a 100-mile cycling course climbing more than 13,700 feet that took Pittacora 12.5 hours to complete. This race is the most challenging, he says. And he’s training to do it again in August. 

One hundred seems to be the magic number for Pittacora: One hundred plus medals, 100-mile courses and his participation in more than 100 races. It’s a funny coincidence, the frequency of this number, because it’s also a reflection of Pittacora’s dedication to the sport. He gives everything his 100%.  

He’s currently preparing for a 15-miler that will take place in West Virginia on July 19. When asked if it’s a relief to be riding such a short distance, he shakes his head. In fact, this race will keep him up the night before, he says. 

“There is zero room for mistakes when you’re riding such a short distance,” he said. “You mess up one time, everyone flies by you and that’s it. You’re done for.” 

To lessen the possibility of any mistakes, he will spend every night for the next few weeks practicing his starting position, so it can be as close to flawless as possible when the starter pistol fires.  

For Pittacora, training isn’t a chore, it’s just part of a hobby. One that began in 2005 and accelerated in 2010 when he retired from his job as a Chicago Police Officer and began preparing for competitive cycle racing. Of course, it’s a good way to stay in shape, he says. But it’s not about the exercise. Pittacora does this because he enjoys it. 

“It’s tiring,” he said. “But that’s not something you notice if you like what you’re doing.” 

Sometimes he will ride to Dan Ryan Woods and time himself racing up and down the toboggan slides.  

Pittacora surely has the stamina, the endurance to excel at something so mentally and physically demanding. But his response when asked how he got to this point is surprising, considering he has certainly earned his bragging rights. It wasn’t hard, he says. Anyone could do it. 

“There’s no magic formula. Just ride.” 

Calling All Men

By Eileen McNichols

The men in our lives can be so busy taking care of home and family that they may neglect their own health. Studies show that men make only two-thirds as many healthcare provider visits as women do. Some men who know (or at least strongly suspect) that they have a problem, may suffer in silence, afraid to find out something is wrong. Others may attribute changes in physical health to aging, and accept symptoms that could easily be relieved as a normal part of life. These behaviors can have a negative effect on quality of life.  

Take prostate health for example.  The prostate gland surrounds the male urethra. It becomes enlarged with advancing age leading to obstruction of the urinary system, a condition known as benign prostatic hypertrophy (BPH). More than 30 million men suffer from BPH. Symptoms include sleepless nights and urinary problems, loss of productivity, depression and decreased quality of life.  

There are a few lifestyle changes that can help manage mild symptoms of BPH.  Relax and allow plenty of time to urinate. Drink fluids throughout the day. During the night, if you awaken frequently to urinate, limit your fluid intake in the evening and empty your bladder before bedtime. Avoid drinking alcohol. It is a bladder irritant and can make you urinate more often. If possible, avoid medicines that can make urination difficult, such as nonprescription antihistamines, decongestants (including nasal sprays), and allergy pills. Check with your doctor or pharmacist about all of the medications you take. 

Many men fear that treatment for their urinary symptoms will lead to erectile dysfunction. The urologists at Little Company of Mary Hospital (LCMH) have treatment options that can preserve sexual function while at the same time relieve the urinary problems associated with BPH.    

Another concern that some men express is that the symptoms they experience are related to prostate cancer. Prostate cancer usually grows very slowly, often causing no symptoms until it is in an advanced stage. It can often be found before symptoms start by testing the amount of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) in a man’s blood. Another way to screen for prostate cancer is the digital rectal exam in which the doctor actually feels the prostate gland.  Want more information about your personal risk factors for prostate cancer? Visit tests.lcmcancercare.org to take a free online test offered by LCMH. 

Top Programs in July 

Little Company of Mary Hospital, 2800 W. 95th St.  

Information/registration: Health Education Center at708 423 5774.  

Health Academy: Kidney Health with nephrologist Veeda Landeras., MD, Mon., July 9, 11 a.m.  Free. North Pavilion. Reservation required. 

Reflexology with certified reflexologist, Mon. and Wed., Health Education Center, West Pavilion. This healing modality stimulates sensitive sensory cells to specific points in areas on the feet, hands, or ears to send the brain that impact the muscles and internal organs. $50 per session. Call for appointment.  

Lung Cancer Screening, Sat., July 14, 8 a.m. to noon, Outpatient Care Center, 6700 W. 95th St. State of the art screening includes a low dose CT scan; must meet criteria from the American Lung Association. $125. No doctor’s order required.  

Orthopedic knee/hip screening, Thurs., July 19, 1 to 3 p.m., Health Education Center, West Pavilion. 10 minute screening for people considering joint replacement surgery. Free. Reservation required. 

 

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