Previews of upcoming arts events

 BAC Presents Art Exhibits, Classes, Concerts, Movies and Wedding Expo in January

Forget about hibernating this month! There is a full schedule of events and activities right around the corner at the Beverly Arts Center, 2407 W. 111th St.

Winners from the BAC Battle of the Bands held last fall return to the Baffes Theatre, Sat.,, Jan. 13. Motel Breakfast performs 7:30 to 9 p.m., and South City Revival performs 9:15 to 11 p.m. All tickets $15; doors open at 6:30 p.m.  An audience favorite, Heartsfield performs up-tempo, foot-stomping Southern and country rock Sat., Jan. 27, 8 p.m.  Tickets are $20 ($18 for BAC members) and doors open at 7 p.m.

BACinema starts the new year with two acclaimed movies.  Annette Bening, Elle Fanning and Greta Gerwig star in “20th Century Women,” the comedy/drama about a teenage boy raised by his mother and two other women amid the love and freedom of 1979 Southern California on Wed., Jan 3, 7 p.m.  On Wed., Nov. 17, “Loving Vincent,” an oil painted animation will be screened. The film is about a young man sent to the last hometown of troubled painter Vincent Van Gogh to deliver a letter from the artist. Once there. The young man ends up investigating Van Gogh’s final days. BACinema screenings are at 7 p.m. Tickets: $6 ($5 for BAC members).

Couples who are making wedding plans can streamline the search for just the right services at the BAC’s 2nd Annual Wedding Expo, Sun., Jan. 21, 11 a.m.  The expo will feature caterers, planners, photographers, florists, food samples and more. Tickets are $10 for individuals or $15 for couples.

Registration continues for BAC School of the Arts winter classes for all age that begin Jan. 8. BAC art educators offer quality instruction in a variety of visual and performance arts. Dance classes range from creative movement for toddlers to ballet, tap, jazz and modern for all ages. Specialty dance classes include Hip Hop and African.  Music classes are offered in strings, piano, guitar, harmonica and percussion. Film classes cover screening writing, editing filmmaking for students age 9 to 17, and include special screenings of student works. Visual arts classes include ceramics, painting, fused glass, photography and comics. Theater department classes cover skills in acting, auditioning and more. The BAC’s popular theater performance classes will stage “My Son, Pinocchio Jr.” for students age 5 to 10 years old, and “A Midsummer Night’s Dream” for students age 11 to 18 years old. Auditions will be held in early January. Class registration is available in person, at www.beverlyartcenter.org, or at 773-445-3838.

Don’t miss the chance to visit two outstanding exhibits that will be closing on Jan. 7:

“Elevation: The Rise of Beverly/Morgan Park,” an architectural installation and exhibition of photographs and historic documents that is part of the Chicago Architecture Biennial in the Jack Simmerling Gallery, and the  41st Annual Beverly Arts Center Competition and Exhibition featuring works by winners and finalists, Atrium Gallery.

“Home Grown in Beverly: Winifred Godfrey Flowers Fifty Years Later,” opens Sun., Jan. 14, 2 to 4 p.m. A nationally noted artist, Winifred Godfrey . Godfrey earned a Bachelor of Science in Art and a Master of Fine Arts from the University of Wisconsin, and exhibited at the Beverly Arts Center soon after it opened.  Her large format work provides a fresh view of the intricate shapes, texture and translucency of flowers using intense backlighting that gives an almost surreal look to the petals. Godfrey’s artwork is included in many private, corporate and museum collections and has been exhibited throughout North America.  Gallery admission is free, and visiting hours are 9 a.m. to 9 p.m., Mon. through Thurs.; 9 a.m. to 6 p.m., Fri.; 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Sat.; closed Sun. except during special events. Tickets, information and class registration are available 773-445-3838 or www.beverlyartcenter.org.

BAC Begins 50th Anniversary Year with New Management Team

As the Beverly Arts Center (BAC), 2407 W. 111th St., Chicago, begins its 50th anniversary year, an innovative approach in facility management is taking center stage. The BAC’s new management team, composed of Artistic Director Shellee Frazee, Development Director Amy Chmura, and Operations Manager Dan Jacobson, will work collaboratively to oversee all aspects of operating the South Side’s premiere fine arts facility.

“Each of these people comes to the table with a complete set of complementary skills and experience required to run the organization at its optimum capacity,” said BAC Board President Barbara O’Malley.  “This team will drive the organization to do extraordinary things as it celebrates 50 years of bringing arts to the Beverly area and Chicago.”

Shellee Frazee manages the programming and administrative staff, and oversees the School of the Arts, main stage events, and Simmerling Gallery. Born and raised in Iowa, Frazee established herself as a director/choreographer and performing arts instructor in the Quad Cities. She relocated to Chicago in 2008 and was Managing Director of Redtwist Theatre before joining the BAC staff in 2009. Frazee has served the BAC as a teaching artist, coordinator for all arts disciplines and interim Executive Director. She was named Artistic Director in 2014. She has a Bachelor of Arts in theatre from St. Ambrose University and over 30 years of professional experience performing, touring, directing and choreographing.

Amy Chmura focuses on capital contributed support, including individual and corporate donations, memberships and grants. She will also manage fundraising events and the annual gala. Chmura has more than 25 years of experience in development, marketing and communications. She has a Master of Arts in Organizational Communications and received her Certified Fundraising Executive Certification in 2015. Chmura has held positions in development and marketing for Chicago area not-for-profit organizations including a regional tourism association, social service agencies and municipal government. Her expertise includes donor relations, corporate and individual giving, event management, grant writing, marketing and volunteer coordination.

Dan Jacobson manages the day to day maintenance of the facility and all aspects of the building and grounds. Jacobson has been working for Chicago area not-for-profit and arts organizations for more than 15 years. He was Theater Manager at Lewis University, General Manager for Chicago Shakespeare Theater, and a General Manager for Blue Man Group. Jacobson also served as the Director of Operations for the Arts and Business Council of Chicago for seven years. His most recent position was Operations Manager for the National Audubon Society/Audubon Great Lakes. He holds a Bachelor’s degree with a concentration in painting from Lewis University and has a Masters in Interdisciplinary Art from Columbia College Chicago.

“The Beverly Arts Center is heading into a new era,” said Board member Ed Laginess. “As we enter our 50th year, our goal is to honor our past and look to the future.”

The BAC will celebrate its 50th anniversary at events throughout the year, including the gala in April where past board members and their contributions to the Center will be recognized.  “We truly want to thank these folks, our members and the community for their support through some difficult years,” Laginess said.  “We have weathered the storm and now is a time to prepare for the future and celebrate our accomplishments.”

As a not-for-profit regional fine arts center, the Beverly Arts Center is supported by memberships, gifts and grants.  Donations are tax deductible to the extent allowed by law. For more information about the BAC and how you can contribute to its mission to provide fine arts education and programming in visual and performance arts, call 773-445-3838 or email Development Director Amy Chmura, amy@beverlyartcenter.org.

Beverly Art Competition Exhibit Continues Through Jan. 7

The 41st annual Beverly Arts Center Art Competition Exhibition opened Sat., Nov. 11 with a reception and awards presentation in the Jack Simmerling Gallery at the Center, 2407 W. 111th St. Ashley Gardner was awarded the Beverly Bank Best of Show Award for her work “Family Portrait.” The Alice & Arthur Baer Award went to Jake Saunders for “St. Francis,” and the Bill & Judie Anderson Award was presented to Ray Broady for his work “Hot Dogs.”

Other winners in this year’s competition are: Figurative Award, Erik Sorenson, “Social (Me)dia;” Non-Representational Award, John David Murray, “Girl with Striped Socks;” 3-Dimensional Award, Charity White , “Karen;” Photographic/Digital Award, Louisa Murzyn, “A Dark History;” and three Honorable Mention Awards, John Landendorf, “Pictures at an Exhibition,”  Erin Kramer, “Crown Hare” and  Andrea Dalgaard, “Organized Chaos.”

Prizes range from $100 to $1500. Competition sponsors are Beverly Bank & Trust, Little Company of Mary Hospital, and the Chicago Department of Cultural Affairs and Special Events (DCASE).

Competition jurors were Judie Anderson, professional illustrator and former Art Director for the Chicago Tribune, and noted artist/muralist Elaine Miller.

“For 41 years, the Beverly Arts Center Competition has been a continually quality show, and this year’s exhibit is no exception,” said Judie Anderson. “New talent is visible as well as work by established artists. There is something for everyone to enjoy.”

The Beverly Arts Center Art Competition is open to artists living and working within 100 miles of the city of Chicago. Eligible media include painting, photography, prints and other two-dimensional work, as well as sculpture including fabric and ceramic sculpture.

Established in 1976 by real estate developer Arthur Rubloff and Chicago artists William and Judie Anderson, the contest celebrates the talent of area artists. The exhibit will be open through January 7. Gallery admission is free. Gallery hours are 9 a.m. to 9 p.m., Mon. through Thurs.; 9 a.m. to 6 p.m., Fri.; 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Sat.; closed Sun. except during special events. Beverly Art Center, 2407 W. 111th St. Info: 773-445-3838, www.beverlyartcenter.org.

Public Art Installation Coming to 99th Street in November

By Kristin Boza

A permanent piece of public art will be unveiled at 99th and Walden Parkway in November. “Quantum Me” is an impressive sculpture fabricated from mirror polished stainless steel (similar to “Cloud Gate” — The Bean — in Millennium Park) and dichroic Plexiglas, and the creation of Chicago artist Davis McCarty. The piece is the 19th Ward’s installation through the City of Chicago’s 50×50 Neighborhood Arts Project.

“Quantum Me” will give viewers an incredible color-changing perspective on themselves and the environment.

“I was inspired by the idea of bending spacetime to jump from one location to another faster than the speed of light,” McCarty said. “If you walk around ‘Quantum Me,’ the colors will magically change before your eyes. Two people standing in different locations can actually see different colors looking at the same spot.”

McCarty explains that this phenomenon is just how sub-atomic particles behave. “We get to witness on a large scale a very amazing part of the universe through this sculpture,” he said.

The idea of teleporting is carried through McCarty’s companion piece, to be installed in Rogers Park. “Because my sculptures are book-ending the city on the north and south, they speak to each other. The idea is that you can stare into one and teleport yourself into the other,” he said. “With ‘Quantum Me,’ people will look up into a giant spherical ball that warps them into the sky. The Rogers Park sculpture is reversed; the ball is on the ground. Viewers will have a similar but different experience.”

McCarty grew up in Southeast Asia where his missionary parents started schools in Thailand and the Philippines. He moved back to the United States to attend school at Beloit College in Wisconsin. “A lot of east Asian temples influence my art. I appreciated the temple that people built that took hundreds of laborers 40-50 years to complete. I love a plain, modern design aesthetic, but I always add extra scroll work and other details to show people the time that it took to create,” he said.

Science and technology are infused within McCarty’s art. “I used to be a lot more of a nerd; I was a computer science major in college, but after doing that for a few years I realized I liked gaming but not coding,” he said. “I had a corporate job for nine years, and made the leap to full-time artist about two months ago. It was one of those things where I got two big commissions and thought ‘if there’s ever a time to do it, now is the time.'”

The sculptures for the 19th Ward and Rogers Park took McCarty about four months to complete and, because of the materials used to create them, they will last for decades.

“They will look as great in 50 years as they do today,” McCarty said. “As a society, we use images to share our experience with others. Creating a sculpture that allows people to photograph themselves in the art while simultaneously capturing the city is a great way to commemorate the experience of visiting Beverly. I hope to make people ask ‘where is that?’ and want to plan their own visit.”

McCarty’s “Quantum Me” was selected for the 19th Ward by a panel of community members, including representatives from BAPA, the Ward office, residents and artists. The project was spearheaded by the Beverly Area Arts Alliance.

The Neighborhood is the Gallery Beverly Art Walk Day

Start seeing art in unexpected places throughout Beverly/Morgan Park. The 4th annual Beverly Art Walk on Sat., Oct., 7, 12 to 7 p.m., will feature work by more than 200 artists in over 60 alternative exhibition spaces. The Beverly Art Walk is a free family-friendly event. Walk, bike, or park and jump on one of the three free trolleys to experience all the Art Walk has to offer.

Event planners, the Beverly Area Arts Alliance, work with local small business, organizations, and artists to transform the neighborhood into a temporary gallery district. Art is housed in storefronts and restaurants, vacant buildings and outside courtyards, as well as schools and churches.  Not to be missed highlights include an East Beverly yard, which will be transformed into a performance and sound space for artists Cecil McDonald and Brother El; the currently vacant Olivia’s Garden building will be a hub of art from Bridgeport, Blue Island, Pullman, and Cleveland; and the historic Ingersoll-Blackwelder house will return to its artistic roots in displaying work by eight artists, including former owner Jack Simmerling.

Events and activities abound for people of all ages. Trinity Unites Methodist Church, 99th and Winchester, will open its stage for music and performances; at Ridge Historical Society, photographer Mati Maldre will demonstrate how a Deardorff Camera, which uses 4 x 5 sheets of film, is used for architectural photography; and five talented artists in Beverly/Morgan Park, Judie Anderson, Ray Broady, Jomo Cheatham, Pat Egan, and Brian Ritchard open their home studios for an insight on the artistic process, their inspirations, and the work they produce.

Clissold School will host the popular Children’s Park on their front lawn, 110th and Western. Artist Cindy Wirtz and Clissold student and family volunteers will offer a variety of children’s art activities, including kite making, creations from recycled materials, origami peace cranes, and more. Live music, storytelling, a food truck, the Peaceful Playground, a performance by the Pack Drumline, and an interactive public art project will all be featured.

Venues, inside and out, will also be alive with music. More than 30 local music performances will occur throughout the day, including acoustic acts, classical quartets, blues, rap, and rock-n-roll. Chicago’s vibrant music scene will be showcased across the neighborhood and at the Horse Thief Hollow main stage for featured acts. The Beverly Art Walk is also thrilled to host Front Porch Concerts, a pop-up concert series set on front porches throughout Chicago’s diverse neighborhoods. Their goal is to create a unique live music experience while building community and promoting city exploration. FPC will perform in Beverly/Morgan Park—for the first time—at two locations, Brian Ritchard’s and Judie Anderson’s home studios.

For more information about Beverly Art Walk events and activities, view the program book and map online at www.beverlyarts.org. Program books will also be available at each participating venue on October 7th.

The Beverly Art Walk would not be possible without the generous financial support of local small businesses and families, as well as countless volunteer hours by the Alliance board, artists, and neighbors. Support the local arts community: purchase art, shop participating venues, and attend Alliance events. They are driven by a love for art and the people who make it, and are thankful for local businesses and organizations who embrace the arts. The Beverly Area Alliance is a 501c3 not-for-profit organization.

 

Neighborhood Notes: News and Events for October 2017

 

Beverly Art Competition Accepting Applications. Artists within 100 miles of the city of Chicago are invited to enter the annual Beverly Arts Center Art Competition and Exhibition, a juried contest that offers prizes that range from $1500 for Best of Show to $100 for honorable mentions. The non-refundable entry fee is $35, and the submission deadline is Oct. 16. Established in 1976 by real estate developer Arthur Rubloff and artists William and Judie Anderson, the contest celebrates the talent of area artists. Finalists and winning works will be exhibited at the Beverly Arts Center, 2407 W. 111th St. The exhibit opening and awards presentation will be held on Nov. 11.  Entry forms are available at the Beverly Arts Center or can be downloaded from the website, www.beverlyartcenter.org.

CAPS Meetings:  CAPS Beat 2221, Tues., Oct. 3, 7 p.m. Christ the King, 9225 S. Hamilton; CAPS Beats 2211 and 2212, Thurs., Oct. 5, 7 p.m. 22nd District Police Station, 1900 W. Monterey; CAPS Court Advocacy Subcommittee, Wed., Oct. 11, 1:30 p.m. 22nd District Police Station; CAPS Beat 2213, Thurs., Oct. 12, 7 p.m. Ridge Park, 9625 S. Longwood Dr.; CAPS Senior Subcommittee, Tues., Oct. 24, 10:30 a.m. 22nd District Police Station; CAPS Domestic Violence Subcommittee, Thurs., Oct. 26, 10:30 a.m., 22nd District Police Station Info: 312-745-0620.

Local School Council Meetings: Vanderpoel Humanities Academy LSC, Tues., Oct. 3, 5:30 p.m., 9510 S. Prospect Ave.;  Kellogg School LSC, Thurs., Oct. 5, 6 p.m., School Library, 9241 S. Leavitt St.,  773-535-2590; Clissold School LSC, Mon., Oct. 16, 7 p.m. , School Auditorium, 2350 W. 110th Pl., 773-535-2560; Sutherland School LSC, Tues., Oct. 17, 6:30 p.m., 10015 S. Leavitt St., 773-535-2580; Barbara Vick Early Childhood & Family Center LSC, Wed., Oct. 18, 3:45 p.m. to 4:45 p.m., Vick Center, 2554 W. 113th St.,  773-535-2671; and Morgan Park High School LSC, Wed., Oct. 18, 7 to 9 p.m. School Library, 1744 W. Pryor, 773-535-2550.

 

Kate Starr Kellogg School, 9241 S. Leavitt, hosts the 16th annual High School Fair Thurs., Oct. 5, 4:30 to 6:30 p.m. in the school gym. Representatives from local public and private high schools will be available for questions from students and families. Open to all. Info: Mrs. Rooney, 773-535-2598 or mirooney@cps.edu.

 

Landscape Guidelines Workshop. Chicago Greystone & Vintage Home Program, Christy Webber Landscapes, and the Chicago Botanic Garden will present a workshop about Chicago landscape guidelines and how they can be applied to enhance the beauty and sustainability of their properties Thurs., Oct. 5, 6:30 to 8 p.m., Chicago High School for Agricultural Sciences, 3857 W. 111th St. Learn the basic principles of landscape design, site considerations such as sun/shade, soil and water, plant selection, and seasonal maintenance. Registration is required by Oct. 4. 773-329-4111 or www.nhschicago.org (click on the “learn how” tab).

Towel Collection for Homeless Shelters. The Beverly Hills Junior Woman’s Club is partnering with Almost Home, a local non-profit, to provide shower kits for homeless guests in emergency shelters by collecting bath/beach towels and washcloths (used is fine) until Oct 14. Donations can be dropped off at BAPA, 1987 W. 111th St., Christ the King Parish, 9235 S. Hamilton Ave., or Bethany Union Church, 1750 W. 103rd St.  A BYOB painting party fundraiser is planned for Fri., Oct. 6, 7 p.m., Bethlehem Lutheran Church, 9401 S Oakley Ave. Tickets are $30 and must be purchased in advance.  Info/tickets: 312-593-1129 or beverlyjuniors@gmail.com.

Teen LGBTQ+ Support Group: A support group that provides an affirming space for gender expansive, transgender, agender, lesbian, gay, queer, bisexual, LGBTQ+ High School aged teens meets monthly at Beverly Therapists, 10725 S. Western, 2nd floor, and also offers social activities. Info: Christina Sprayberry, LCSW, 314-550-4384 or Bonn Wade, LCSW, 773-330-2544.

Electronics and Hazardous Waste Collection. Beverly Unitarian Church will host a collection of household electronics and hazardous waste in the church parking lot, at 103rd and Seeley, Sat., Oct. 7, 8:30 to 11 a.m. The collection is sponsored by the church’s Green Sanctuary Group and Beverly Bank, and donations are encouraged to help defray costs. Accepted electronics include computers, monitors, printers, small electronics, TV under 35 inches, cell phones and pagers. Hazardous items must be properly sealed and include mercury fluorescent bulbs, anti-freeze, used motor oil, oil based paints, batteries, lawn chemicals, pool chemicals and solvents. Find complete list of what will be accepted at www.beverlyunitarian.org/green-sanctuary-group

Garage Sale Benefits Maple/Morgan Park Food Pantry. Morgan Park Junior Woman’s Club will host its annual Garage Sale benefit to support the Maple/Morgan Park Food Pantry Sat., Oct. 7, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., Bethany Union Church, 1750 W. 103rd St. The indoor venue allows shoppers to support the Food Pantry come rain or shine. This event has raised thousands of dollars to assist our neighbors in need.  With the holidays approaching, the Food Pantry is being used more and more and needs your help. Support this cause and get some bargains.

22nd District Dog Walk. The 22nd District Police Domestic Violence Subcommittee hosts the 8th annual Dog Walk Sat., Oct. 7 9:30 a.m. at the police station, 1900 W. Monterey Ave. The event raises awareness about domestic violence and its link to animal abuse. You don’t need to bring a dog to attend. In addition to the walk, participants will enjoy a blessing of the dogs, raffles, giveaways and light refreshments. Info: 312-745-0620.

Community Blood Drive. Community Blood Drive. The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, 11107 S. Vincennes, hosts an interdenominational community blood drive with the American Red Cross, Thurs., Oct. 12, 2 to 7 p.m. About 38,000 people need blood each day in the United States, and each pint of donated blood may help as many as three people. To minimize wait times, call 1-800- 733-2767 for an appointment. On the day of the drive, pre-register at www.redcrossblood.org/RapidPass.

Wellness Seminar. Beverly Therapists, 10725 S. Western, 2nd floor, wellness seminars on the second Saturday of each month, September through May.  On Sat., Oct, 14, 3 to 5 p.m., “Beyond the Power Struggle: Supporting Teens,” offers insight into adolescent development, attachment and positive youth development theories. This interactional workshop offers parents a deeper dive around the competing needs that confront many adolescents and explores the developmental, neurodevelopmental, and social factors that impact a young person’s ability as they transition successfully to adulthood. Learn techniques to communicate and intervene with your teenager within a supportive group setting. $10. Register at www.BeverlyTherapists.com.

October at Beverly Arts Center. There’s a lot of fun in store this month at the Beverly Art Center, 2407 W. 111th St.: An Evening with M&R Rush, Sat., Oct. 14, 8 p.m., $15; Get Spooky family fun, Sun., Oct. 22, 2 to 4 p.m., free; and Michael McDermott’s Halloweensteen, Sat., Oct. 28, 8 p.m., $30. BAC get member discounts on tickets. Info: 773-445-3838, www.beverlyartcenter.org.

Mercy Circle Tour. Meet Marge Everett, Senior Living Advisor and other key staff members at Mercy Circle, 3659 W. 99th St., during an open house, Sun., Oct. 15, 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Visitors can tour the continuing care retirement community and learn about services and amenities. Mercy Circle provides a continuum of care ranging from independent living, through assisted living and into skilled nursing care.   Assisted living residents have access to physical, occupational and speech therapy services as prescribed by their physicians, as well as comprehensive help with medications, bathing and other physical needs.

Finding Holiday Joy When Grieving. Finding Holiday Joy When Grieving, a seminar exploring ways for people who are grieving the loss of a loved one to get through one of the toughest times of the year, will be held Sat., Oct. 21, 3 to 5:30 p.m., Beverly Therapists, 10725 S. Western., 2nd floor. The session includes a DVD presentation, discussion, sharing, strategies for resilience, and a chance to create memory boxes to take home (bring a photo of your loved). Info/registration: www.BeverlyTherapists.com.

“Conspiracy” Film Showing.  at Morgan Park United Methodist Church. In light of the current political and cultural climate of hate in our country, Morgan Park United Methodist Church,11030 S. Longwood Dr., is hosting opportunities to bring our community together for a conversation about the issue. On Fri., Oct. 20, 6 p.m., the church will show the film “Conspiracy”, which depicts a meeting held in January 1942 by the Nazi leadership to elicit support for a plan to exterminate the Jews. The community is invited to the viewing, conversation and personal story sharing aimed at creating ethnic and racial understanding and compassion.The event is co-sponsored by Unity and Diversity and 19th Ward Ald. Matt O’Shea. Info: 773-238-2600.

Beverly Theatre Guild Presents ‘Avenue Q.’ The Beverly Theatre Guild presents its fall musical, “Avenue Q,” on the weekends of Oct. 20 to 22 and Oct. 27 to 29 at the Morgan Park Academy Arts Center, 2153 W. 111th St. Staged like a children’s show, “Avenue Q” is a satire about a recent Princeton graduate who moves to a shabby New York apartment and struggles to find a job and meaning in life. The show carries a parental advisory. Tickets are $21 and available online at www.beverlytheatreguild.org, or by calling 773-BTG-TIXS.

League of Women Voters Meeting.  The League of Women Voters of Chicago-Far Southwest Side Group will meet Wed., Oct. 25, 7 p.m., Beverly Unitarian Church, 10244 S. Longwood Dr., to discuss Tax-Increment Financing. The League is a non-partisan organization that provides informal discussion of current political, social and economic issues. Public welcome. Info: 312-939-5949, 773-233-1420 or lwvchicago.org.

Day of the Dead Lecture and Workshop. In a workshop that includes a lecture on Day of the Dead (Dia de Muertos) traditions and Alebrije folk art, Carlos Orozco, an indigenous artist from Oaxaca, Mexico, will present examples of traditional folk art then provide workshop participants with wooden skull cutouts to paint in the traditional Alebrije style, Wed., Nov. 1, 6 to 8 p.m., Beverly Branch Library, 1962 W. 95th St. Registration required: 312-747-9673.

New Venues, New Vendors for HollyDays. HollyDays, the popular shopping/socializing event that supports the I Am Who I Am Foundation will be held Sat., Nov. 4, 6 to 10 p.m., at two new venues: Cork & Kerry, 10614 S. Western, and Barney Callaghan’s Pub, 10618 S. Western. The event features 20 new artists and vendors, and a community of teens and adults with special abilities showcasing the new line of I Am bath and body products. Donations are welcome at the door. HollyDays provides funding for awareness and programs benefiting families with members who have special needs.

Chicago Architecture Biennial Programs Continue at BAC

As an anchor site for the international Chicago Architecture Biennial, the Beverly Arts Center, 2407 W. 111th St., is prepared to welcome people from throughout the city and the world to participate in special programs that focus on how the built forms of Chicago’s neighborhood inform the past, present and future of communities.

“Elevation: The Rise of Beverly/Morgan Park,” an architectural installation and exhibition of photographs and historic documents, continues through Jan. 7 in the BAC’s Simmerling Gallery. Admission is free. Hours: 9 a.m. to 9 p.m., Mon. through Thurs.; 9 a.m. to 6 p.m., Fri.; 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Sat.; closed Sun. except during special events.

As a stop on the Beverly Art Walk, Sat., Oct. 7, 12 to 5 p.m., the BAC invites visitors to explore the themes Elevation and Making New History. Families are invited to construct their own model cities using Legos and to design posters that imagine the future of the Beverly/Morgan Park neighborhood.

How the arts affect neighborhoods is the topic of a panel discussion being hosted at the BAC on Thurs., Oct. 19, 7:30 p.m. in the Baffes Theatre. Representatives from south side Chicago Architecture Biennial anchor sites Hyde Park Art Center, Dusable Museum, National Museum of Mexican Art and the BAC will share insights and ideas about the ways the arts visually and culturally impact how neighborhoods are shaped and influence the direction of a neighborhood’s future.

Mark Kelly, Commissioner of the Chicago Department of Cultural Affairs and Special Events (DCASE), will moderate the panel discussion. Prior to his appointment to head DCASE in June 2016, Kelly had a long career fostering the arts experience across 100 different degree programs for students at Columbia College Chicago. He is founder and chair of the Wabash Arts Corridor initiative in the South Loop. Throughout his career, Kelly has served on many arts and cultural-centric boards.

For information on these programs, contact the BAC, 773-445-3838 or www.beverlyartcenter.org.

Boundary Art Space Opens in Morgan Park Garage

By Carol Flynn

Boundary, a new art exhibit space, opened in June in the garage of the Chicago bungalow at 2334 W. 111th Pl. The co-directors are Susannah Papish, who owns and lives at the property, and Larry Lee.

Papish and Lee are not new to Chicago’s art scene. Both hold Masters in Fine Arts degrees from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago and are accomplished artists. They have distinguished careers in academia and administration. Lee is associate director of undergraduate admissions for SAIC, and is a lecturer on art history, theory and criticism. Papish is an undergraduate alumni recruiter for SAIC and reviews portfolios of prospective students. She has taught at a number of colleges.

Both are passionate about nurturing and supporting artists. Lee is careful not to refer to Boundary as a “gallery” because the concept is broader than a commercial enterprise for selling art.

“Boundary is an art project space that allows artists to ‘incubate’,” said Lee. “We serve as an advocate for the individual artists who exhibit with us.”

The idea for Boundary grew out of Lee’s and Papish’s visits to alternative art spaces and pop-up galleries. They both believe that one of the wonderful things about Chicago is the positive encouragement for artists and alternative settings. This has helped to bring art out of downtown and into neighborhoods, making it more accessible and less intimidating to people.

“I like to keep my finger on the pulse of the city’s art scene, and when I travel, I love to walk through museums to see what is going on,” said Lee. “The alternative spaces and pop-ups represent the vanguard for the next generation of artists; they empower the artists to operate on the fringes or along side the existing system.”

Both add that many spaces and art districts that start out as alternative become main stream. Lee referred to this as “the natural cycle.”

In 2005, Lee began Molar Productions, which he described as a “mobile curatorial project” that allowed him to stage pop-up shows. He has helped a number of friends build out artist spaces. Lee had his eye on his long-time friend Papish’s garage for years. Papish used the garage as her studio, but after she moved her studio to her basement, Lee was finally able to convert the garage into a 420-square foot project and exhibit space.

The name Boundary was chosen because the location is on the far outskirts of the city. But the word also means a frontier, unchartered and unexplored territory beyond the edge of the known, an area for discovery. And there is the psychological interpretation of “personal boundaries” – the beliefs, opinions, attitudes, etc., that help define a person, always relevant in understanding an artist’s work.

Since the opening, two exhibits have been held. The first was “Off Normal,” featuring Chicago artist John Dodge. The second, closing on Sept. 2, was “Triple Happiness,” featuring works by Annette Hur, Julie Lai and Chinatsu Ikeda.

Preparations are underway for the opening of Boundary’s third exhibit, “ANTI/body,” by Maya Mackrandilal, on Fri., Sept. 8, 6 to 9 p.m. It is for free to the public and the artist will be present. The exhibit runs through Oct. 28 and will be open for the Beverly Art Walk on Sat., Oct. 7.

Mackrandilal is a transdisciplinary artist, writer and arts administrator. She is mixed-race with roots in the Caribbean, South America, South and East Asia, and West Africa. Her artwork explores solidarity and liberation, and radical futures, for women of color. She is the Fine Arts Coordinator for the city of Buena Park, Calif.

Parking is on the street, and visitors are greeted by the family cats while walking down the driveway to the yard and garage. Boundary is informal and approachable, yet unique and cutting edge – a welcome addition to the fluid and ever-evolving art scene in Chicago.

Info on the upcoming exhibit: www.boundarychicago.space. Appointments to visit Boundary: 773-316-0562 or boundarychicago@gmail.com.

Beverly Art Walk #4 Set for Oct. 7

The 4th annual Beverly Art Walk is scheduled for Sat., Oct. 7, 12 to 7 p.m., at sites throughout Beverly/Morgan Park. The Art Walk will feature work by more than 200 talented artists and makers in 55 venues, as well as artist demonstrations, children’s activities, live music, public art, craft beer, and complimentary trolleys. The Art Walk is a free, family-friendly event and attracts more than 6,000 visitors each year.

In addition to hubs of activity from 95th to 111th, Western to Wood, the Art Walk will feature the MT Walk on Walden Festival, presented by the Southwest Chicago Diversity Collaborative, at 103rd Street. The multi-media celebration of walkable, bikable diversity in our community is sponsored by the Chicago Community Trust Acting Up Award.

Beyond our commercial corridors, artists will open their home studios for an insight into their artistic processes, inspirations and work.

A highlight of the 99th and Walden hub will be “Quantum Me,” the public art piece by Chicago artist Davis McCarty that will be installed there. Members of the Beverly Area Art Alliance spearheaded the project, working with Ald. Matt O’Shea and a volunteer committee of local residents, business owners and civic representatives. The project is funded by the City of Chicago’s 50×50 Neighborhood Arts Initiative.

Alternative exhibition spaces will also be featured, including Boundary, a Morgan Park garage that has been transformed into a gallery, and a live performance/sound piece outside a home in East Beverly by the artist Brother El, in partnership with Terrain Exhibitions.

Free live music performances, from blues to folk, jazz to rock n roll, as well as The School of Rock and Ayana Contreras, a producer, host, and dj at WBEZ, will be showcased throughout the day. Art Walk festivities end with a closing party at Horse Thief Hollow, 10426 S. Western, 7 to 10 p.m., featuring the New Orleans-influenced funk, R&B, and jazz tunes of The Big Lagniappe.

The Beverly Art Walk is organized by the Beverly Area Arts Alliance, a volunteer-run 501c3 not for profit organization that relies on the support and participation of Beverly/Morgan Park’s residents and business community. This year, organizers are excited to welcome some of the neighborhood’s newest small businesses, including Open Outcry Brewing Co., Marlo Hair Salon, Capsule, and B-Sides Coffee + Tea, in addition to returning venues and pop-up galleries. Artists from the Chicagoland area, as well as surrounding states, will display work ranging from paintings and sculpture to handmade candles and jewelry. Artists will be present to talk about their work, most of which will be available for purchase.

For more information about the Beverly Area Arts Alliance, visit www.beverlyarts.org.

 

‘Elevation’ Explores The Rise of Beverly/Morgan Park

Beverly Arts Center is anchor site for Chicago Architecture Biennial

By Grace Kuikman

Long, long before the architects designed the hilltop mansions that help to define the built form of what is now Beverly/Morgan Park, glaciers carved out the topography of the area, inch by inch, leaving behind the highest hill in Chicago.

“Elevation,” a major exhibition that opens on Sept. 17 at the Beverly Arts Center (BAC), 2407 W. 111th St., captures the impressive rise of Beverly/Morgan Park and how its elevation continues to inspire the beauty and culture of the community. The exhibit is the central focus of the BAC’s contribution to the 2017 Chicago Architecture Biennial, a city-wide exploration of how the past, present and future converge to create Chicago’s neighborhoods. The Biennial runs mid-September through early January, with the Chicago Cultural Center as the central location, and several anchor sites – including the BAC – that will offer a variety of artistic and inventive programming around the theme “Make New History.”

The inaugural Biennial was held in 2015, the manifestation of Mayor Rahm Emanuel’s vision for an international architecture event. The successful Biennial was developed by the Chicago Department of Cultural Affairs and Special Events. This year’s event brings the focus out into Chicago’s neighborhoods. It is the largest architecture and design exhibition in North America, and features presentations by more than 140 participants from 20+ countries.

The Beverly Arts Center’s selection as one of a half dozen anchor sites is quite prestigious, and provides a spectacular opportunity to showcase the neighborhood.

“Beverly/Morgan Park is arguably the most architecturally significant residential neighborhood in the city,” said architect James Gorski, founding principal of Bureau of Architecture and Design and Beverly/Morgan Park resident. Gorski is the visionary talent behind the “Elevation” exhibit at the BAC.  “[The community’s] extraordinary glacial beginnings and resulting topography combined with the mid-19th century introduction of the Rock Island commuter rail spurred a steady development of well-designed and crafted residences from the late 19th century through the building boom of post-World War II.”

Using architectural installations, maps and photographs, “Elevation” will be located the BAC’s Simmerling Gallery and offer a compelling encounter that illustrates how the massive glaciers literally shaped our community and, millions of years later, provided an inspiring palate for renowned architects like Frank Lloyd Wright, H.H. Waterman, Walter Burley Griffin, G. W. Maher, Edward Dart and many others.

“The exhibition celebrates Beverly/Morgan Park’s exceptional history and architectural pedigree while seeking to engage the local and visiting community in a dialog for the future vision of the neighborhood,” Gorski said.

Gorski designed the exhibition and has worked closely with other local talents whose efforts are bringing “Elevation” to reality. Photographer Rebecca Healy has photographed more than 60 local buildings, capturing the artistry and unique design elements of their craftmanship. Her photos will reflect how today’s community has evolved from its historical roots.

“I approached shooting each piece of architecture from an artistic prospective, making sure to include the defining aspects of each building,” Healy said. She considered not just the building but the context of surrounding environment that, in a neighborhood like this, contributes so much to the overall artistry and impact.

Edris Hoover of Ridge Historical Society assisted Gorski with research into the earliest days of the area, helping to uncover information about the path of the glacier that created the Blue Island Ridge and the shores of Lake Chicago which once reached way beyond Longwood Drive then receded to what we know as Lake Michigan; the history of the area’s early native American residents and the influx of the pioneers who first built log cabins in the heavily wooded surroundings once known as Horse Thief Hollow; and the profound influence of the architects and home builders who, following the Great Chicago Fire in 1871, were so attracted to the hilly, rustic area just 30 minutes from the the city on the new commuter train.

Mauricio Caslan, a student at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago who works with Gorski at his architecture firm, helped to design the exhibit installations. Andy Horin of Plateau Properties helped Gorski build them.  Main Street Beverly blogger Jeff Danna provided ideas based on his quest to foster urban walkability and connectedness in residential and commercial areas.

Exhibition visitors will be pivotal in the Make New History component of the Biennial at the BAC. In the gallery, through programs, in poster-making and in other arenas, they will be asked to share their ideas for how Beverly/Morgan Park may look and function in the future.

Chicago Architecture Biennial Schedule at BAC

The official unveiling of the elevation themed mural by Elaine Miller, will be Sept. 10, 10 a.m., in the city parking lot at 95th and Longwood Drive. The mural was commissioned by the Beverly Arts Center as a gift to the community, and funded by a grant from the Chicago Architecture Biennial.

The “Elevation” exhibition will open to the general public on Sept, 17, 2 to 4 p.m., in the Simmerling Gallery at the BAC. In addition to the expansive installation and art in the gallery, the Biennial exhibits in other BAC gallery spaces will feature watercolors of neighborhood institutions by artist Judie Anderson and architectural photographs by Mati Maldre from his comprehensive documentation of Beverly/Morgan Park architecture for exhibit at the Chicago Architecture Foundation in1986. Photos from Maldre’s exhibit are used in BAPA’s Historic Homes brochure which will be available at the BAC to encourage people to continue their “Elevation” experience by exploring the neighborhood.

During the Beverly Art Walk on Oct, 7, BAC Biennial visitors will enjoy hands-on activities for kids that include building a Lego city and creating posters of what Beverly/Morgan Park will look like in the future.

On Oct. 19, 7:30 p.m., the BAC will host a panel discussion with the Chicago Architecture Biennial south side anchor sites on how the arts affect neighborhoods. Participating are BAC, Hyde Park Art Center, DuSable Museum and National Museum of Mexican Art.

Planned programs also include a teen studio workshop on Nov. 18, and ongoing activities.

For more information on local Biennial events and programs, contact the Beverly Arts Center, 773-445-3838 or www.beverlyartcenter.org. For information on citywide activities for the Biennial, visit chicagoarchitecturebiennial.org.